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Judaism-Orthodox

"Freedom for Agunot" Flyer, 1993

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"Freedom for Agunot" newspaper insert, by Agunah Inc. and GET, 1993.

Courtesy of Rivka Haut. View PDF.

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Haut, Rivka
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freedom_for_agunot_flyer

"Freedom for Agunot" newspaper insert, by Agunah Inc. and GET, 1993.

Courtesy of Rivka Haut. View PDF.

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"Freedom for Agunot Now" Pin

agunot_pin.jpg

"Freedom for Agunot Now" pin, created by Agunah, Inc., and GET.

Courtesy of Rivka Haut.

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JWA use only on jwa.org
Contributor: Owner
Haut, Rivka
Original file name
agunot_pin

"Freedom for Agunot Now" pin, created by Agunah, Inc., and GET.

Courtesy of Rivka Haut.

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"Feminism: Is it Good for the Jews?" in Hadassah Magazine, April 1973

hadassah_article_april_1973.jpg
"Feminism: Is it Good for the Jews?" by Blu Greenberg, published in Hadassah Magazine, April 1976.
Courtesy of Blu Greenberg and Hadassah Magazine. View PDF.
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Greenberg, Blu
Contributor: Institution
Hadassah Magazine
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hadassah_article_april_1973

"Feminism: Is it Good for the Jews?" by Blu Greenberg, published in Hadassah Magazine, April 1976.

Courtesy of Blu Greenberg and Hadassah Magazine. View PDF.

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LA Jewish Feminist Center Brochure, 1990

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Brochure announcing the creation of the LA Jewish Feminist Center, 1990.
Courtesy of Rabbi Sue Levi Elwell, Director, URJ PA Council. View PDF.
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Elwell, Sue Levi
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la_jewish_feminist_center_brochure

Brochure announcing the creation of the LA Jewish Feminist Center, 1990.

Courtesy of Rabbi Sue Levi Elwell, Director, URJ PA Council. View PDF.

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Helene Aylon's Self Portrait, 2004

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Self portrait by Helene Aylon from “The Digital Liberation of G-d,” 2004, San Francisco JCC
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Self portrait by Helene Aylon from “The Digital Liberation of G-d,” 2004, San Francisco JCC

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Bat Mitzvah Interview Questions

Questions provided for the interview aspect of the Go & Learn lesson plan for youth, "More Than Just a Party: Bat/Bar Mitzvah, Then and Now."
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Jewish Women's Archive
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Jewish Women's Archive
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Bat Mitzvah Interview Questions

Questions provided for the interview aspect of the Go & Learn lesson plan for youth, "More Than Just a Party: Bat/Bar Mitzvah, Then and Now."

But Why Do They Have to be Rabbis?

Although my friends usually come into the conversation unable to comprehend why nice, Orthodox girls would want to enter the rabbinate, I certainly hope they leave the discussion slightly more enlightened. They don’t have to agree with me at the end of the day; Judaism is very fluid, and no two people must come to the same conclusion regarding the interpretation of halakha. I just hope they can understand why women like the recent Yeshivat Maharat graduates may want to choose the rabbinate or a religious leadership role.

Maharats, Misogyny and Marching On

It was a late spring-time graduation unlike any other, a landmark event in Jewish history.  On June 16th, at the Ramaz School on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, for the first time ever, with the bestowal of a parchment and the recitation of a specially chosen biblical phrase, three women became spiritual leaders and legal authorities within Orthodox Jewry: Our sister, may you become a multitude. (Genesis 24:60).

We Begin to Become a Multitude

This was the first time that Orthodox women were ordained in an institutional setting. There was a profound sense that not only was this a big moment for the three women getting ordained, but also for the men who trained them. I could hear the pride in Rabbi Jeffrey Fox, the Rosh HaYeshiva’s voice, and how much this meant to Rabbi Avi Weiss. In particular, Rabbi Weiss emphasized the desire to give a professionally recognized title to these women (even if it is Maharat, rather than Rabba), and the absolute necessity of the support of the male rabbis who have welcomed these women into their congregations. For Rabba Sara, I had the profound sense that she was creating an exciting new cohort of colleagues for herself. It’s one thing to be a groundbreaker, but totally another to bring others along with you, to create a system and a path for future generations. 

Learn to Do Good, Seek Justice, Relieve the Oppressed

I’m not sure when I realized that the true Torah value is inclusion and acceptance of our LGBT+ brethren. Perhaps it was because my mom became close friends with a gay man who’s very active in gay social life. Maybe it was because of my increased involvement in feminism; after all, the National Organization for Women (NOW), the largest feminist organization in the US (of which I am a member), lists lesbian rights as one of its top priority issues. Or maybe it was just maturity. Whatever the reason and whenever it actually happened, I began to support gay rights, both within and without the Jewish community.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Judaism-Orthodox." (Viewed on May 2, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/judaism-orthodox>.

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