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Judaism-Orthodox

Mordecai Kaplan, 1915

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Mordecai Kaplan in 1915.
Courtesy of the Menorah Journal/Project Gutenburg.
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Public Domain

Mordecai Kaplan in 1915.


Courtesy of the Menorah Journal/Project Gutenburg.

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Nima Adlerblum's Book Memoirs of Childhood

nima_adlerblum_cover.jpg

Cover of Nima Adlerblum's book, published after her death. She was a writer, educator, and Zionist activist in New York and Jerusalem.

Rights
Public Domain

Cover of Nima Adlerblum's book, published after her death. She was a writer, educator, and Zionist activist in New York and Jerusalem.

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Rivka Haut

rivka3.jpg
Rivka Haut.
Courtesy of Tamara Weissman
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Rivka Haut.

Courtesy of Tamara Weissman

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Rivka Haut

rivka2.jpg
Orthodox feminist activist Rivka Haut.
Courtesy of Tamara Weissman
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Orthodox feminist activist Rivka Haut.

Courtesy of Tamara Weissman

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Leandra Medine

Through her fashion blog, Man Repeller, Leandra Medine argues that fashion should be about what women find interesting and exciting to wear, not just attracting a man.

Ruth Kisch-Arendt

Ruth Kisch-Arendt became one of Germany’s foremost performers of lieder—nineteenth–century allegorical poems set to music—through the intense period of anti-Semitism leading up to the Holocaust, then used her talents to highlight great Jewish composers after WWII.

Mordecai Kaplan

The founder of Reconstructionist Judaism, Mordecai Kaplan struck a fundamental blow for women’s participation in Jewish ritual with the bat mitzvah of his eldest daughter, Judith.

Leandra Medine

leandra_medine.jpg
Leandra Medine.
Courtesy of Man Repeller.
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org

Leandra Medine.

Courtesy of Man Repeller.

Related content:

Esther Jungreis

Esther Jungreis played a significant role in drawing nonobservant young Jews to Orthodox Judaism through her dynamic public speaking and her organization, Hineni.

Rebecca Fischel Goldstein

Both as a rabbi’s wife and as a leader in her own right, Rebecca Fischel Goldstein strove to make women a significant force in Orthodox Judaism.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Judaism-Orthodox." (Viewed on May 3, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/judaism-orthodox>.

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