You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Judaism-Conservative

Ezrat Nashim’s “Jewish Women Call for Change,” March 14, 1972

Ezrat_Nashim.JPG
Ezrat Nashim’s “Call for Change,” presented to the Rabbinical Assembly of the Conservative movement on March 14, 1972.
Courtesy of the personal archive of Paula Hyman.
Rights
Other license (see note)

Ezrat Nashim’s “Call for Change,” presented to the Rabbinical Assembly of the Conservative movement on March 14, 1972.


Courtesy of the personal archive of Paula Hyman.

Related content:

JTS Faculty Senate votes to admit women

October 24, 1983

The Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) faculty senate voted to allow women admission to the JTS Rabbinical School.

Jewish Women Watching declare "Sexism is a sin"

September 21, 2001

Jewish Women Watching published an advertisement in the "New York Times," asking Jewish women to hold their community accountable for sexism.

Amy Eilberg ordained as first female Conservative rabbi

May 12, 1985

Amy Eilberg became the first woman ordained as a Conservative Rabbi at the Jewish Theological Seminary's commencement exercises in New York City.

Judith Kaplan celebrates first American Bat Mitzvah ceremony

March 18, 1922

Judith Kaplan (Eisenstein) became the first American Bat Mitzvah.

Ezrat Nashim presents manifesto for women's equality to Conservative rabbis

March 14, 1972

A small group of young Jewish feminists under the name "Ezrat Nashim" presented a manifesto entitled "Jewish Women Call For Change" at the Conservative movement's Rabbinical Assembly convention.

Creation of Women's League of the United Synagogue

January 21, 1918

Conservative Jewish women united their sisterhood organizations, creating the Women's League of the United Synagogue under the leadership of Mathilde Schechter.

Francine Klagsbrun Carries the Torah, 1991

Klagsbrun-Francine.jpg
Francine Klagsbrun, in 1991, carries the Torah to the Kotel to conduct a prayer service.
Courtesy of Joan Roth.
Francine Klagsbrun, in 1991, carries the Torah to the Kotel to conduct a prayer service.
Courtesy of Joan Roth.

Related content:

Cantor Betty Robins

Robbins-Betty.jpg

Betty Robbins was born in Greece, immigrated with her family, first to Poland and then to Australia, and ultimately made her home in the United States. In 1955, she was appointed the cantor of New York's Temple Avodah— perhaps "the first woman cantor in five thousand years of Jewish history."

Institution: Sandra Robbins

Betty Robbins was born in Greece, immigrated with her family, first to Poland and then to Australia, and ultimately made her home in the United States. In 1955, she was appointed the cantor of New York's Temple Avodah— perhaps "the first woman cantor in five thousand years of Jewish history."

Institution: Sandra Robbins

Related content:

Cantor Nancy Abramson at the Community Feminist Seder, March 1994

Cantors.jpg

Cantor Nancy Abramson is shown here at the March 1994 Community Feminist Seder, sponsored by MA'YAN: The Jewish Women's Project. More than two hundred women attended.

Photographer: Joan Roth.

Cantor Nancy Abramson is shown here at the March 1994 Community Feminist Seder, sponsored by MA'YAN: The Jewish Women's Project. More than two hundred women attended.

Photographer: Joan Roth.

Related content:

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Judaism-Conservative." (Viewed on February 7, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/judaism-conservative>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs