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Jewish Studies

Avigayil Halpern Davening

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Avigayil Halpern davening.

Avigayil Halpern davening.

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Amy Eilberg

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Rabbi and co-founder of the Bay Area Jewish Healing Center, Amy Eilberg. Eilberg was the first woman rabbi ordained by the Conservative Movement.

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Rabbi and co-founder of the Bay Area Jewish Healing Center, Amy Eilberg. Eilberg was the first woman rabbi ordained by the Conservative Movement.

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Standing Again at Sinai by Judith Plaskow

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Standing Again at Sinai: Judaism from a Feminist Perspective, by Judith Plaskow. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1990.
Courtesy of Judith Plaskow
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Standing Again at Sinai: Judaism from a Feminist Perspective, by Judith Plaskow. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1990.

Courtesy of Judith Plaskow

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"Boiled in Oil: Becoming the First Syrian Woman Rabbi," by Dianne Cohler-Esses

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Written during her first year at the Jewish Theological Seminary in 1995, Dianne Cohler-Esses's personal essay explores her experience preparing to become to enter rabbinical school to become the first Syrian-Jewish woman to become a rabbi, and the first Syrian-Jewish non-Orthodox rabbi through seven conversations with her parents, their friends, and a rabbi in her community.


Used with permission of Dianne Cohler-Esses, 1990. View PDF.

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Cohler-Esses, Dianne
Original file name
boiled_in_oil_article

Written during her first year at the Jewish Theological Seminary in 1995, Dianne Cohler-Esses's personal essay explores her experience preparing to become to enter rabbinical school to become the first Syrian-Jewish woman to become a rabbi, and the first Syrian-Jewish non-Orthodox rabbi through seven conversations with her parents, their friends, and a rabbi in her community.

Used with permission of Dianne Cohler-Esses, 1990. View PDF.

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Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky, 1926 - 2012

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky’s parents immigrated to the United States from Poland around the turn of the last century. Early in their marriage, they made an unsuccessful try at farming and then operated a hand laundry on New York’s Lower East Side. With the help of a land grant from Jewish charities set up for that purpose, they tried again, joining a community of Jewish farmers in Farmingdale, NJ.

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky with Bradley Bradley, 1974

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Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky at a campaign stop with then-Senator Bill Bradley of New Jersey in 1974.

Photo courtesy Ben Dubrovsky.

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Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky at a campaign stop with then-Senator Bill Bradley of New Jersey in 1974.

Photo courtesy Ben Dubrovsky.

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky, circa 1990

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Writer, historian, and independent scholar, Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky (1926 – 2012), circa 1990.

Photo courtesy Ben Dubrovsky.

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Writer, historian, and independent scholar, Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky (1926 – 2012), circa 1990.

Photo courtesy Ben Dubrovsky.

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Tefillin Barbie: Considering Gender and Ritual Garb

Do women in your community wear tefillin and tallit when they pray? Do you? For many, the relationship between gender and ritual garb is still evolving, as Jews consider their personal and communal associations with these objects and practices. This Go & Learn guide uses the provocative image of "Tefillin Barbie"—created in 2006 by soferet (ritual scribe) Jen Taylor Friedman—to explore issues of gender, ritual, and body image.

Lilith Evolved: Writing Midrash

In this Go and Learn, guide, we explore the notion of midrash and highlight "The Coming of Lilith" by theologian Judith Plaskow as an example of how contemporary Jewish feminists have created their own midrashim—retellings of biblical stories—in order to incorporate women's viewpoints into the traditional texts of Judaism. In writing their own versions of these texts, Plaskow and her peers have made Judaism more inclusive of the voices and perspectives of all people who engage in its teachings.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Jewish Studies." (Viewed on February 12, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/jewish-studies>.

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