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Jewish Holidays

Eating Jewish: North African salads for Rosh Hashanah

Not only is it almost the beginning of a new year, but the weather is beginning to change and the tomatoes, zucchini and corn that have been so plentiful over the summer are being replaced by squash, apples, pears, figs and a multitude of other autumn fruits and vegetables. The availability of all this fantastic produce has made the High Holidays one of my favorite times on the Jewish calendar to be cooking. This is especially true for Rosh Hashanah, when the food symbolism of the holiday necessitates the use of seasonal fruits and vegetables.

Mengedarrah

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Mengedarrah.
Photograph courtesy of Katherine Romanow.
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Mengedarrah.
Photograph courtesy of Katherine Romanow.

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Eating Jewish: Mengedarrah for Tisha B’Av

I wanted to write an Eating Jewish post about Tisha b’Av, yet as I started looking through my various cookbooks, I noticed that most of them had no mention of the holiday. It was often missing from the index and even recipes containing ingredients that would usually be included in a dish prepared on Tisha b'Av had no mention of it. I did find mention of Tisha b’Av in Gil Marks' Encyclopedia of Jewish Food, which devotes an entry to it (there’s a reason I’m constantly referring to this book) as well as in his cookbook The World of Jewish Food.

Julie Rosewald becomes the first woman to lead services in an American synagogue

September 20, 1884

Julie Rosewald became the first woman known to have led services at an American synagogue when she led the music, chanted portions of the worship normally reserved for a cantor, and directed the choir at San Francisco's Temple Emanu-El following the death of the congregation's cantor.

Esther M. Broner, 1930 - 2011

She was our spiritual leader. She made room for us at the table by creating a whole new one—a Seder table at which women’s voices were heard. She encouraged us to ask the Four Questions of Women and to recite women’s plagues, of which there were always more than 10.

Esther Broner Seder with Letty Cottin Pogrebin and Martha Ackelsberg

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Esther Broner, center, celebrates the Passover seder at the home of Bea Kreloff and Edith Isaac-Rose. Edith Isaac-Rose and Adrienne Cooper are seated to her right; to her left are Letty Cottin Pogrebin and Martha Ackelsberg.

Photograph by Joan Roth.

Courtesy of the Jewish Daily Forward.

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Contributor: Institution
The Forward
Esther Broner, center, celebrates the Passover seder at the home of Bea Kreloff and Edith Isaac-Rose. Edith Isaac-Rose and Adrienne Cooper are seated to her right; to her left are Letty Cottin Pogrebin and Martha Ackelsberg.

Photograph by Joan Roth.

Courtesy of the Jewish Daily Forward.

Related content:

We remember Esther M. Broner

We were saddened to wake up to the news that Esther M. Broner passed away yesterday. A beloved novelist, playwright, ritualist, and feminist writer, Esther M. Broner was born on July 8, 1927, in Detroit, Michigan. Her writing, including Her Mothers (1975), A Weave of Women (1978) and many others, made her one of the most important teachers of Jewish feminism and feminist Judaism.

Sutlach (Aromatic Milk Pudding)

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Sutlach, also known as Muhallabeya (Aromatic Milk Pudding).
Photograph by Katherine Romanow.
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JWA use only on jwa.org
Sutlach, also known as Muhallabeya (Aromatic Milk Pudding).
Photograph by Katherine Romanow.

Related content:

Eating Jewish: Sutlach (Aromatic Milk Pudding)

It was a busy weekend here for me in Montreal.

Twitter

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Twitter on a computer screen.
Courtesy of trekkyandy
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Twitter on a computer screen.
Courtesy of trekkyandy

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Jewish Holidays." (Viewed on May 1, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/jewish-holidays>.

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