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Jewish Holidays

Sambusak el Tawa (Iraqi Chickpea Turnovers)

sambusak_el_tawa_iraqi_chickpea_turnovers.jpg
Sambusak el Tawa (Iraqi chickpea turnovers).
Courtesy of Katherine Romanow
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Sambusak el Tawa (Iraqi chickpea turnovers).
Courtesy of Katherine Romanow

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Eating Jewish: Iraqi Purim Delicacies

With preparation for Purim in full swing, there is no doubt that many people are thinking about Hamantaschen, which has become synonymous with this holiday in North America.

Gluten-free Bakery Style Hamantaschen

gluten-free-hamantaschen2.jpg
Close up of hamantaschen, includes filling details.
Courtesy of Claire/Gluten Freedom
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Close up of hamantaschen, includes filling details.
Courtesy of Claire/Gluten Freedom

Related content:

Gluten-free Bakery Style Hamantaschen

gluten-free-hamantaschen.jpg
Close up of Hamantaschen.
Courtesy of Claire/Gluten Freedom
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Close up of Hamantaschen.
Courtesy of Claire/Gluten Freedom

Related content:

Gluten-free bakery style hamantaschen

These were my first Hamantaschen. What is a Hamantaschen, you might wonder? These cookies are little three-cornered wonders that puff up into bite-size pastries filled with any number of things, including jam, chocolate hazelnut spread, nuts, dates, and perhaps most commonly, poppy seed filling or prunes. Their triangular shape is sometimes called evocative of the ears of the villain of the holiday of Purim - you guessed it - Haman, who is defeated in the story as told in the Book of Esther.

Striped Hamantaschen

striped-hamantaschen.jpg
Striped hamantaschen.
Courtesy of Preeva Tramiel
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Striped hamantaschen.
Courtesy of Preeva Tramiel

Related content:

Rolling in Dough

My congregation is having a big Purim Party on Sunday. They will need about 300 hamantaschen and I am bringing enough dough to make 2/3 of them.

Celebrating "Esthers with Attitude" this Purim

Purim is just around the corner and it's deliciously serendipitous that the Jewish holiday with the most well-known heroine happens to fall during Women's History Month.

"Esther y Mardoqueo escribiendo la primera carta del Purim" by Aert de Gelder

aert_de_gelder_-_esther_y_mardoqueo_escribiendo_la_primera_carta_del_purim.jpg

"Esther y Mardoqueo escribiendo la primera carta del Purim," by Aert de Gelder (1645–1727).

Image Source: Wikimedia.

Rights
Public Domain

"Esther y Mardoqueo escribiendo la primera carta del Purim," by Aert de Gelder (1645–1727).

Image Source: Wikimedia.

Eating Jewish: Recipes for a tasty Tu B’Shevat table

Although there are no specific dishes that have traditionally been prepared for Tu B’Shevat, the custom of serving dishes that contain fruits and nuts has emerged.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Jewish Holidays." (Viewed on February 7, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/jewish-holidays>.

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