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Jewish Holidays

Mengedarrah

mengedarrah_-katherineromanow-smaller.jpg
Mengedarrah.
Photograph courtesy of Katherine Romanow.
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JWA use only on jwa.org
Mengedarrah.
Photograph courtesy of Katherine Romanow.

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Eating Jewish: Mengedarrah for Tisha B’Av

I wanted to write an Eating Jewish post about Tisha b’Av, yet as I started looking through my various cookbooks, I noticed that most of them had no mention of the holiday. It was often missing from the index and even recipes containing ingredients that would usually be included in a dish prepared on Tisha b'Av had no mention of it. I did find mention of Tisha b’Av in Gil Marks' Encyclopedia of Jewish Food, which devotes an entry to it (there’s a reason I’m constantly referring to this book) as well as in his cookbook The World of Jewish Food.

Julie Rosewald becomes the first woman to lead services in an American synagogue

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Julie Rosewald became the first woman known to have led services at an American synagogue when she led the music, chanted portions of the worship normally reserved for a cantor, and directed the choir at San Francisco's Temple Emanu-El following the death of the congregation's cantor.

Esther M. Broner, 1930 - 2011

She was our spiritual leader. She made room for us at the table by creating a whole new one—a Seder table at which women’s voices were heard. She encouraged us to ask the Four Questions of Women and to recite women’s plagues, of which there were always more than 10.

We remember Esther M. Broner

We were saddened to wake up to the news that Esther M. Broner passed away yesterday. A beloved novelist, playwright, ritualist, and feminist writer, Esther M. Broner was born on July 8, 1927, in Detroit, Michigan. Her writing, including Her Mothers (1975), A Weave of Women (1978) and many others, made her one of the most important teachers of Jewish feminism and feminist Judaism.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Jewish Holidays." (Viewed on February 12, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/jewish-holidays>.

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