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Holocaust

Survivors and storytelling in "Four Seasons Lodge"

This week I had the opportunity to screen a documentary about a community of Holocaust survivors who bought a bungalow colony in the Catskills called the Four Seasons Lodge to spend their summers together at each year.  I was looking forward to seeing the film after my cousin sent me a link to the trailer. I knew exactly why she was so excited about it -- the survivors in the trailer acted and sounded exactly like our grandparents, Ben and Rose Berkenwald.    

Why the Anne Frank video is so unsettling

I logged onto the computer last weekend to see that Anne Frank was a trending topic on Twitter. That was largely thanks to the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, which released (as the Bintel Blog reported) a new video, showing the only known footage of Anne, leaning out of a window and watching a married couple. It immediately became a hit on YouTube. Seeing such a timelessly tragic figure from another time on such definitively contemporary context — Web 2.0 — had an odd feeling to it. And then of course, Anne got caught in the middle of a bizarre dust-up between David Mamet and the Disney Studio. (Mamet’s re-imagining of the diary onscreen involved a contemporary girl going to Israel to learn about the trauma of suicide bombings) and she is the subject of a new book by Francine Prose.

The Holocaust: Something to laugh about?

The most recent issue of Heeb Magazine is causing quite a stir.  The issue features Roseanne Barr wearing an apron and a Hitler mustache, pulling a tray of “burnt Jew cookies” out of an oven.  The Heeb publisher posted an article explaining the editorial choice, which discusses a cultural shift towards acceptance of “Holocaust humor.”  Heeb argues that old taboos are relaxing. Jews are beginning to embrace the Holocaust in a new way - as something to laugh about. Is this true? Has the Holocaust really become funny?

A Not-So-Formal Introduction

Hello, my name is Leah Berkenwald and I am the newest ‘Jewess with Attitude’ blogging for the Jewish Women's Archive.

Dramatization of Anne Frank's diary broadcast on the radio

December 14, 1952

The first radio dramatization of Anne Frank's diary was broadcast.

Death of Ilona Karmel, literary chronicler of the Holocaust

November 30, 2000

Death of teacher and author Ilona Karmel, who drew upon her experiences as a young girl in Nazi labor camps and offered one of the first literary portrayals of the Holocaust.

Rita Levi-Montalcini wins the Nobel Prize

October 13, 1986

Rita Levi-Montalcini's pioneering work on nerve growth earned her the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Ruth Gruber finds haven for 1,000 Holocaust refugees

August 3, 1944

American Jewish journalist Ruth Gruber arrived in New York harbor with 984 refugees from Nazi-occupied Europe, which concluded her secret mission to escort the refugees from Italy to America.

Historian Deborah Lipstadt is vindicated in libel suit brought by Holocaust denier

April 11, 2000

A British court resolved David Irving's libel case against Deborah Lipstadt in favor of Lipstadt, affirming Lipstadt's portrayal of Irving as an anti-Semitic Holocaust denier.

Hannah Arendt's "Eichmann in Jerusalem" appears in "The New Yorker"

February 16, 1963

The first of the articles that, in expanded form, would become "Eichmann in Jerusalem," Hannah Arendt's most controversial work, was published in "The New Yorker."

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Holocaust." (Viewed on December 18, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/holocaust>.

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