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Holocaust

Lilli Palmer and Helmut Schmidt, April 1, 1982

lilli_palmer_interview.jpg
Lilli Palmer interviews German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt on April 1, 1982.
Photograph by Harald Hoffmann, courtesy of the German Federal Archives/Wikimedia Commons
Rights
Creative Commons (attribution)

Lilli Palmer interviews German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt on April 1, 1982.

Photograph by Harald Hoffmann, courtesy of the German Federal Archives/Wikimedia Commons

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Top Ten Moments For Jewish Women In 2014

I’ve already expressed my feelings on the whole “year of the Jewish woman” thing, but that’s not to say we shouldn’t celebrate the many great moments for Jewish women in 2014. Here, in no particular order, are a few of our favorites at JWA.

Gertrud Amon Natzler

Ceramicist Gertrud Amon Natzler and her husband Otto created thousands of stunning ceramics together, an exquisite collaboration that continued even after her death.

Irene Nemirovsky

First censored and then killed during the Holocaust, novelist Irène Némirovsky finally achieved the recognition she deserved long after her death.

Hephzibah Menuhin

Hephzibah Menuhin had a stellar career as a pianist, but a visit to Theresienstadt in 1947 drew her to a new calling as a human rights activist.

Vladka Meed

Freedom fighter Vladka Meed smuggled dynamite into the Warsaw Ghetto to aid the Jewish uprising and helped children escape by hiding them in Christian homes.

Hannah Szenes in Uniform, 1944

hannah_szenes.jpg
Hannah Szenes in a Hungarian army uniform as a Purim costume, 1944.
Rights
Public Domain
Contributor: Submitter
Benson, Stephen
Hannah Szenes in a Hungarian army uniform as a Purim costume, 1944.

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Adele Rosenwald Levy

Philanthropist Adele Rosenwald Levy demonstrated her leadership skills and her passion for the Jewish community when she helped inspire American Jews to donate even more to aid Holocaust survivors than they had given to support the war effort.

Nora Levin

While her books sparked controversy among historians, Nora Levin helped shape popular understanding of modern Jewish history.

Blume Lempel

Told repeatedly from an early age that girls were not worth educating and that uneducated people couldn’t be writers, Blume Lempel defied expectations to write beautiful, unusually modernist Yiddish literature.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Holocaust." (Viewed on February 10, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/holocaust>.

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