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Holocaust

Charlotte Wardi

Charlotte Wardi, professor of French and comparative literature at the University of Haifa—and for a time general inspector of French-language instruction in Israel—was born in Cologne on September 21, 1928 and brought to France at the age of five months.

Walldorf Camp: Hungarian Jewish Women (August-November 1944)

Apart from the large, well-known concentration camps, hundreds of small labor camps existed during the Second World War, among them the Walldorf Camp at the Frankfurt airport in Germany.

Simone Veil

Simone Veil is arguably the one person most responsible for advancing women’s legal rights in France during the twentieth century. As her country's first female Minister of Health, Veil fought against great opposition to have a woman's right to an abortion enshrined in French law. She went on to become the first woman—and the first Holocaust survivor—to be appointed president of the European Parliament.

Zelda Nisanilevich Treger

Zelda Treger belonged to the Nekamah (Vengeance) battalion, the Jewish unit under the command of Abba Kovner (1918–1987). As a courier, she was continuously sent to the city to obtain weapons, medicines, information on the army’s movements and even on rescue missions from the labor camp. Together with her fellow partisans, Treger participated in the liberation of Vilna.

Mina Tomkiewicz

Mina Tomkiewicz's first book, Tam si? tez zylo (There Life Also Went On), registers her own experiences as well as those of other Polish Jewish families transported in August 1943 from the Polski Hotel to Bergen Belsen. Bomby i myszy (Of Bombs and Mice), her only, highly autobiographical, novel was first published in a Hebrew translation in 1955 and in Polish in London in 1966.

Faige Teitelbaum

Faige Teitelbaum was the wife of the late Satmar rebbe, Rabbi Joel Teitelbaum (died 1979). She was a leader of the Satmar Hasidic community and often performed the role of a Hasidic rebbe. In this powerful role, she was undoubtedly the best-known woman in the Hasidic world.

Nechama Tec

Nechama Tec's sociological work, informed by her experience as a Holocaust survivor, addresses the silences and inaccuracies surrounding the Holocaust and reveals untold stories of righteousness and rescue.

Tema Sznajderman

The real heroes of the Holocaust period are mostly those who did not survive, remained little known and had no myths built around them. One such person was Tema Sznajderman, also known by her Aryan name of Wanda Majewska, one of the first couriers and an especially brave one.

Hannah Szenes (Senesh)

One of the more poignant songs included in many Holocaust memorial convocations held in Israel, is a short poem, set to music, known popularly as “Eli, Eli.” The four-line poem, actually entitled “Walking to Caesarea,” was written by one of the more mythological figures in contemporary Jewish and Israeli history, Hannah Szenes, whose short life and death have propelled her into the pantheon of Zionist history.

Bela Szapiro

Before World War II, Lublin was one of the largest Jewish communities in Poland. Bela Szapiro’s activities contributed to making it the vibrant cultural and political center of Polish Jewry that it was.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Holocaust." (Viewed on September 22, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/holocaust>.

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