You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Hebrew

Kashariyot, Tema Sznajderman, Bela Hazan, and Lonka Korzybrodska

Kashariot.jpg
(L to R) Tema Sznajderman, Bela Hazan, and Lonka Korzybrodska, members of the He-Halutz ha-Za’ir-Dror movement and of a group of young women known as the kashariyot, who smuggled documents, weapons, newspapers, money, medical supplies, news, forged identity cards, ammunition—and other Jews—into and out of the ghettos.
Courtesy of Yad Vashem, Jerusalem.
(L to R) Tema Sznajderman, Bela Hazan, and Lonka Korzybrodska, members of the He-Halutz ha-Za’ir-Dror movement and of a group of young women known as the kashariyot, who smuggled documents, weapons, newspapers, money, medical supplies, news, forged identity cards, ammunition—and other Jews—into and out of the ghettos.
Courtesy of Yad Vashem, Jerusalem.

Related content:

Shulamith Hareven

Hareven-Shulamith.jpg
Shulamith Hareven.
Courtesy of Shulamith Hareven.
Shulamith Hareven.
Courtesy of Shulamith Hareven.

Related content:

Congregation B'nai David Sunday School Graduation, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1948

Jewish-Education-3.jpg
Congregation B'nai David, Detroit, Michigan, Sunday School graduation, circa 1948. The four congregational leaders pictured are Mr. Joseph Gorman, President (upper L); Rabbi Eric Greenbaum (lower L); Cantor Hyman Adler (upper R); and Rabbi Joshua Sperka (lower R).
Courtesy of Shlomo Sperka, Detroit.
Congregation B'nai David, Detroit, Michigan, Sunday School graduation, circa 1948. The four congregational leaders pictured are Mr. Joseph Gorman, President (upper L); Rabbi Eric Greenbaum (lower L); Cantor Hyman Adler (upper R); and Rabbi Joshua Sperka (lower R).
Courtesy of Shlomo Sperka, Detroit.

Related content:

Mire Gola

Gola-Mire_small.jpg
Mire Gola.
Courtesy of the Ghetto House Fighters Archive.
Mire Gola.
Courtesy of the Ghetto House Fighters Archive.

Related content:

Marcia Falk

Falk-Marcia_small.jpg

Poet, translator, liturgist and artist, Marcia Falk's spiritual and linguistic sensibilities shine forth in works full of literary imagery and inspiration.

Institution: Marcia Falk.

Poet, translator, liturgist and artist, Marcia Falk's spiritual and linguistic sensibilities shine forth in works full of literary imagery and inspiration.

Institution: Marcia Falk.

Related content:

Judith Kaplan Eisenstein with Her Family, circa 1930s

Eisenstein-Judith.jpg

The first American woman to celebrate a Bat Mitzvah, Judith Kaplan Eisenstein (1909 – 1996) later contributed to her culture as a successful composer and musicologist, publishing the first Jewish songbook for children. She is shown here in the early 1930s embarking on a trip with her family.

From left to right: Her sister, Naomi; her mother, Lena; her husband, Rabbi Ira Eisenstein; Judith; her father, Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan; and her sisters Selma and Hadassah.

Institution: The Ira and Judith Kaplan Eisenstein Reconstructionist Archives, Reconstructionist Rabbinical College.

The first American woman to celebrate a Bat Mitzvah, Judith Kaplan Eisenstein (1909 – 1996) later contributed to her culture as a successful composer and musicologist, publishing the first Jewish songbook for children. She is shown here in the early 1930s embarking on a trip with her family.

From left to right: Her sister, Naomi; her mother, Lena; her husband, Rabbi Ira Eisenstein; Judith; her father, Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan; and her sisters Selma and Hadassah.

Institution: The Ira and Judith Kaplan Eisenstein Reconstructionist Archives, Reconstructionist Rabbinical College.

Related content:

Yemima Tchernovitz-Avidar, 1998

Tchernowitz-Yemimah.jpg
Yemima Tchernovitz-Avidar in 1998.
Courtesy of Rama Zuta, Jerusalem.
Yemima Tchernovitz-Avidar in 1998.
Courtesy of Rama Zuta, Jerusalem.

Related content:

Dalia Ravikovitch

Ravikovitch-Dalia.jpg

The first woman poet in Hebrew of her generation, Dalia Ravikovitch was an instant success in the male-dominated field of the time. Her lyrical words enable us to accompany her as she "travels" through both real worlds and those of her imagination.

Institution: Dalia Ravikovitch

The first woman poet in Hebrew of her generation, Dalia Ravikovitch was an instant success in the male-dominated field of the time. Her lyrical words enable us to accompany her as she "travels" through both real worlds and those of her imagination.

Institution: Dalia Ravikovitch

Related content:

Rahel Bluwstein, 1917

Rahel-2.jpg

Rahel Bluwstein in Russia, 1917: "Ani Odeni Poh v'Mamtina Odeni" (I am still here and still waiting). Stranded in France and Russia by World War I, she was able to return to her beloved Palestine in 1919.

Institution: Uri Milstein

Rahel Bluwstein in Russia, 1917: "Ani Odeni Poh v'Mamtina Odeni" (I am still here and still waiting). Stranded in France and Russia by World War I, she was able to return to her beloved Palestine in 1919.

Institution: Uri Milstein

Related content:

Kadya Molodowsky, Ida Maze, and Rokhl Korn

Molodowsky-Kadya.jpg
Ida Maze (C) with fellow Yiddish writers Kadya Molodowsky (L) and Rokhl Korn (R).
Courtesy of Sylvia Lustgarten.
Ida Maze (C) with fellow Yiddish writers Kadya Molodowsky (L) and Rokhl Korn (R).
Courtesy of Sylvia Lustgarten.

Related content:

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Hebrew." (Viewed on April 30, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/hebrew>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs