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Hebrew

Sarah Thon

As a child in Galicia, her father ensured that Sarah Thon would receive a good education despite the family's poverty. As an adult in Palestine, she established a network of lace-making schools around the country to provide a source of livelihood to hundreds of girls from destitute families.

Yemima Tchernovitz-Avidar

Born in Lithuania, Yemima Tchernovitz-Avidar wrote six childhood diaries in Hebrew. After moving to Palestine at the age of twelve, she went on to write over forty books that have become classics of modern Hebrew children’s literature.

Hasya Sukenik-Feinsod

Hasya Sukenik-Feinsod, one of the first kindergarten teachers in Palestine and among the earliest to fight for equal rights for women in the Yishuv, received her professional training in Berlin and devoted all her time and energies to the development of kindergartens in Palestine.

Chana Shpitzer

Although not well-known outside Jerusalem, Chana Shpitzer was an important figure in the history of Israeli education and a pioneer in the field of Jewish education for girls.

Sarah Shmukler

Sarah Shmukler—nurse, midwife and Second [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:293]Aliyah[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary] pioneer—is an outstanding example of Israel’s working women. Her death in Yesud ha-Ma’alah in 1919, as she battled a yellow fever epidemic, made her a symbol of the fate of the new woman of the Land of Israel, her creativity and her love.

Anna G. Sherman

Anna G. Sherman was one of the unsung heroes of the Hebraist movement in the United States. A passionate believer in Hebrew as the vehicle for nurturing Jewish identity, Sherman taught adults, mostly women, at the extension schools of the Teachers Institute of the Jewish Theological Seminary for approximately forty years.

Havvah Shapiro

Over her lifetime, Havvah Shapiro composed some fifty pieces of literary criticism, fiction, or journalism appearing in over half a dozen Hebrew periodicals, as well as a collection of short sketches and a scholarly monograph. Of the nineteenth-century women writers of Hebrew in the Diaspora, Shapiro is the most prolific.

Second Aliyah: Women's Experience and Their Role in the Yishuv

The question of women’s identity in Jewish society in general and Yishuv society in particular has attracted some scholarly attention. The majority of the studies offer an approach that depicts the adoption of masculine characteristics by the new Hebrew woman and the excessive admiration for masculine labor as opposed to feminine labor.

Martha Schlamme

Once described as a “Viennese Mary Martin,” Martha Schlamme began her American career singing Yiddish and Hebrew songs in the resort hotels of the Catskills in the late 1940s. She earned a national reputation in the 1950s as a performer of “Songs of Many Lands”, and later won acclaim for her interpretations of Kurt Weill songs.

Tova Sanhadray-Goldreich

Tova Sanhadray, chairwoman of the Emunah organization and the first woman member of the [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:345]Knesset[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary] to represent the National Religious Party, is regarded as a pathbreaker, since she began her public activity in Israel at a time when the participation of religious women in public life was not yet considered acceptable.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Hebrew." (Viewed on October 22, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/hebrew>.

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