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Film

Lia Van Leer

Pioneer in the field of art film programming and film archiving in Israel, Lia van Leer is the founder of the Haifa Cinematheque, the Jerusalem Cinematheque, the Israel Film Archive and the Jerusalem Film Festival.

Julie Taymor

Julie Taymor's years of work in theater, opera, film and television and her frequent use of masks and puppets, as well as Asian forms, won her a 1997 Tony Award for The Lion King—the first "Directing" Tony given to a woman in the fifty-year history of the Awards.

Helen Tanzer

Contributing to the dissemination of classical and archaeological works, Tanzer well fulfilled the rigorous requirements of scholar and teacher.

Dawn Steel

Dawn Steel's merchandising prowess became legendary and attracted the attention of studio head Michael Eisner, who offered her a chance to produce films. In 1982 Steel set out to persuade her employers to allow her to produce Flashdance. This huge success would be the first of a long line of successes that resulted in Steel’s ascent to President of Production when Eisner left the studio. She became the second female studio production head in studio history.

Stacey Snider

In 1992 Stacy Snider became the highest-ranking female executive at a Hollywood studio when she was named President of Production at Tri Star. At the end of 1999 she became the CEO of Universal Pictures. Snider lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two daughters.

Tess Slesinger

As a parodic historian of her own times, Tess Slesinger wrote fiction that combined jazzy, up-to-the-minute reports on the state of marriage, sexuality, political culture, and work in 1930s America. Her brief life spanned the continent from the heady world of New York left-wing intellectuals to Hollywood’s sunshine as a screenwriter.

Simone Simon

In life as on the screen, Simone Simon remained discreet and mysterious, a powerful yet secretive presence.

Simone Signoret

Simone Signoret's five-decade career of more than sixty films, her Leftist politics, and her unassailable talent in creating not only memorable but iconic female heroes at every stage of her career, give her an important place in twentieth-century cultural history.

Esfir Il’inishna Shub

An early Soviet filmmaker, the friend and colleague of Lev Kuleshov (1899–1970), Sergei Eisenstein (1898–1948), Vsevolod Pudovkin (1893–1953) and others, Esfir Shub was active as an editor, director, and writer of nonfiction films for twenty years, from 1927 to 1947—one of the few women in the Soviet Union at that time to achieve some standing in the film industry.

Viola Brothers Shore

While attending New York University, Viola Brothers Shore began her career as a writer in a range of disciplines. Her short stories, many about Jewish American lives of the day, were collected in The Heritage and Other Stories (1921).

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Film." (Viewed on December 22, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/film>.

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