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Fiction

Carry van Bruggen

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Writer and journalist Carry van Bruggen (1881-1932).

Image of courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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Public Domain

Writer and journalist Carry van Bruggen (1881-1932).

Image of courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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Suzanne Brogger

Born to Jewish refugees in Denmark during the Nazi occupation, Suzanne Brogger made her family’s story the heart of her powerful novels and essays.

Book Club Meeting: "The Uncoupling"

Welcome to the JWA Book Club! We are excited to gather today to discuss Meg Wolitzer's best-selling novel, The Uncoupling.

When taking part in our comment-based discussion below, remember to hit "Show Reply" and "Show New Comments" to see the full conversation! Meg Wolitzer will be responding to questions mainly through the "reply" feature.

Here are some questions to consider before we begin:

1. How does The Uncoupling explore the ramifications of the loss of sexual desire?

2. What characters resonated most with you as a reader?

"The Uncoupling," by Meg Wolizter, 2011

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The Uncoupling, by Meg Wolizter, published in 2011.
Rights
Public Domain

The Uncoupling, by Meg Wolizter, published in 2011.

Related content:

Lili Berger

Lili Berger’s experiences in the Holocaust heavily influenced her choices as a Yiddish writer and translator, focusing on the tensions outsiders face in different societies.

Hemdah Ben-Yehuda

Hemdah Ben-Yehuda collaborated with her husband, Eliezer Ben-Yehuda, to revive ancient Hebrew and make it a truly functional living language.

Hemdah and Eliezer Ben Yehuda, 1912

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Hemdah and Eliezer Ben-Yehuda in 1912.
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Rights
Public Domain

Hemdah and Eliezer Ben-Yehuda in 1912.

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Related content:

Netiva Ben Yehuda

Although she began her writing career very late in life, Netiva Ben Yehuda transformed the Israeli literary scene with her explosive Palmah trilogy.

Katja Behrens

Part of the first generation of postwar writers in Germany, Katja Behrens grapples with the often difficult relationship between German Jews and the majority.

Katja Behrens, 2012

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Katja Behrens in 2012,
Courtesy of Manfred Sause/Wikimedia Commons.
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Creative Commons (attribution non-commercial share alike)

Katja Behrens in 2012,


Courtesy of Manfred Sause/Wikimedia Commons.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Fiction." (Viewed on May 6, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/fiction>.

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