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Fiction

Cynthia Freeman

Cynthia Freeman is remembered as a best-selling author of popular romances during the 1970s and 1980s. A central theme running through most of Freeman’s novels is the struggle of Jewish immigrants to assimilate to American life while at the same time maintaining Jewish traditions. Freeman’s work was influenced by her family’s closeness and by her concern for the continuation of Jewish life and culture.

Rose Franken

Rose Dorothy Lewin Franken was a celebrated Broadway playwright and director, a Hollywood screenwriter and a popular novelist whose fiction touched a sympathetic chord in American women.

Ellen Frankel

The first woman CEO of a major Jewish publishing house, Ellen Frankel is a pioneering feminist leader in business and the literary arts, a soaring spirit, a cultivator of women’s imaginative thinking, and an engaged and engaging teacher.

Sarah Feiga Meinkin Foner

Sarah Feiga Meinkin Foner wrote about the issues that concerned her most in the language she loved most, Hebrew.

Dvoyre Fogel

“The law of boredom is merciless,” wrote Dvoyre Fogel, a Yiddish writer of poetry, prose and literary and art criticism, in the manifesto that opens her first book of poetry. Fogel’s remarkable experimental poetry, all written in the 1930s, was, in the spirit of early twentieth-century art, radically avant-garde and attuned to all the modernist minimalisms.

Eugénie Foa

Eugénie Foa was born Rebecca Eugénie Rodrigues Henriquès in Bordeaux, France on June 12, 1796 and died in Paris in 1852. Foa was the first professional Jewish woman author, supporting herself entirely from her writings. She wrote children’s books, novels and short stories in the Romantic genre of her day, some of which treated Jewish subjects.

Janette Fishenfeld

Janette Fishenfeld was the first, if not the only, Brazilian Jewish woman writer to display an adamant fidelity to Zionist idealism, while at the same time expressing an objective, though critical, view on the Jewish community in Brazil, its weaknesses and strengths.

Ida Fink

Fragments of the past that resurface in the present, Fink’s writing offers an unflinching and insightful look at wartime experiences and memories. By turns poignant and tender, grim and sardonic, Fink’s lean and unsentimental prose conveys the profound and lasting effects of the Holocaust.

Fiction, Popular in the United States

The explosion of writing by American Jewish women in the twentieth century has produced not only serious fiction, poetry, essays, and autobiography but also a range of popular literature geared to pleasure reading and light entertainment. Jewish women authors have experimented with many genres: regional novels, sagas, historical novels, romances, mysteries and crime fiction, science fiction, fantasy, and humor.

Fiction in the United States

Literature by American Jewish women reflects historical trends in American Jewish life and indicates the changing issues facing writers who worked to position themselves as Americans, Jews, and women.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Fiction." (Viewed on September 3, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/fiction>.

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