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Fiction

Élisabeth Gille

Élisabeth Gille was born Élisabeth Epstein in Paris on May 20, 1937 and died of cancer on September 30, 1996, just as she was achieving a certain amount of fame for three critically-acclaimed books.

Mirra Ginsburg

Mirra Ginsburg, translator, editor, storyteller, linguist and prolific author of books for children, was born in Bobruysk (Byelorussia) on June 10, 1909, the daughter of Joseph and Bronia (Geier) Ginsburg.

Luisa Futoransky

Poet, novelist, music scholar and journalist, Luisa Futoransky has led a life characterized by travel and the arts.

Carl Friedman

The style and themes of Carl Friedman's books has made her unique among Dutch authors.

Cynthia Freeman

Cynthia Freeman is remembered as a best-selling author of popular romances during the 1970s and 1980s. A central theme running through most of Freeman’s novels is the struggle of Jewish immigrants to assimilate to American life while at the same time maintaining Jewish traditions. Freeman’s work was influenced by her family’s closeness and by her concern for the continuation of Jewish life and culture.

Ellen Frankel

The first woman CEO of a major Jewish publishing house, Ellen Frankel is a pioneering feminist leader in business and the literary arts, a soaring spirit, a cultivator of women’s imaginative thinking, and an engaged and engaging teacher.

Rose Franken

Rose Dorothy Lewin Franken was a celebrated Broadway playwright and director, a Hollywood screenwriter and a popular novelist whose fiction touched a sympathetic chord in American women.

Sarah Feiga Meinkin Foner

Sarah Feiga Meinkin Foner wrote about the issues that concerned her most in the language she loved most, Hebrew.

Dvoyre Fogel

“The law of boredom is merciless,” wrote Dvoyre Fogel, a Yiddish writer of poetry, prose and literary and art criticism, in the manifesto that opens her first book of poetry. Fogel’s remarkable experimental poetry, all written in the 1930s, was, in the spirit of early twentieth-century art, radically avant-garde and attuned to all the modernist minimalisms.

Eugénie Foa

Eugénie Foa was born Rebecca Eugénie Rodrigues Henriquès in Bordeaux, France on June 12, 1796 and died in Paris in 1852. Foa was the first professional Jewish woman author, supporting herself entirely from her writings. She wrote children’s books, novels and short stories in the Romantic genre of her day, some of which treated Jewish subjects.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Fiction." (Viewed on April 27, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/fiction>.

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