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Fiction

Nadine Gordimer

In 1991 Nadine Gordimer became the first South African to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. Nadine Gordimer’s work provides a very sensitive and acute analysis of South African society. By depicting the impact of apartheid on the lives of her character, she presents a sweeping canvas of a society where all have been affected by institutionalized racial discrimination and oppression.

Claire Goll

In a life filled with controversy and creativity, Claire Goll published novels and verse, reviewed the fashion, art, film and theater of her day and, with Yvan Goll —the object of her own affection and obsession—wrote volumes of love poetry.

Lea Goldberg

Not only did Goldberg work in a vast range of creative areas—as a poet, author of prose for adults and children, playwright, gifted translator, scholar and critic of literature and theater—but in every one of these fields, and certainly in her poetic output, one can discern many and varied “channels”—from diverse poetic genres to surprising and innovative uses of language and form.

Natalia Ginzburg

Arguably the most important woman writer of post-World War II Italy, Natalia Ginzburg was born on July 14, 1916 in Palermo (Sicily), where her Jewish Trieste-born father, Giuseppe Levi, who later achieved fame as a biologist and histologist, was at the time a lecturer in comparative anatomy. Modest and intensely reserved, Ginzburg never shied away from the traumas of history, whether writing about the Turin of her childhood, the Abruzzi countryside or contemporary Rome—all the while approaching those traumas only indirectly, through the mundane details and catastrophes of personal life.

Margo Glantz

Glantz demonstrates tremendous versatility as an individual and as a writer in the creative ways in which she blends her multiple, cultural, religious and literary affinities. She unabashedly resists classification or categorization of any kind and therefore identifies herself neither as a Jewish writer nor as a composer of personal narrative, nor as a Sor Juanista, the term used to refer to those scholars who devote themselves to the study of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Belonging to no single one of these groups or schools of thought, she is an enigmatic amalgam of all of them. Glantz’s multiplicity is what makes her unique and failure to recognize any one component of her being would diminish her diversity.

Nora Glickman

Widely recognized as a literary critic, Glickman has published the fruit of her research in over a hundred articles and reviews in major journals and anthologies. A considerable amount of this is devoted to the image of the Jew in Latin American and Brazilian literature.

Mirra Ginsburg

Mirra Ginsburg, translator, editor, storyteller, linguist and prolific author of books for children, was born in Bobruysk (Byelorussia) on June 10, 1909, the daughter of Joseph and Bronia (Geier) Ginsburg.

Élisabeth Gille

Élisabeth Gille was born Élisabeth Epstein in Paris on May 20, 1937 and died of cancer on September 30, 1996, just as she was achieving a certain amount of fame for three critically-acclaimed books.

Luisa Futoransky

Poet, novelist, music scholar and journalist, Luisa Futoransky has led a life characterized by travel and the arts.

Carl Friedman

The style and themes of Carl Friedman's books has made her unique among Dutch authors.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Fiction." (Viewed on August 29, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/fiction>.

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