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Carry van Bruggen

Fighting the constraints of her Orthodox upbringing and expectations of her role as a wife and mother, novelist Carry van Bruggen wrote movingly of both the need for freedom and the isolation it could bring.

Suzanne Brogger

Born to Jewish refugees in Denmark during the Nazi occupation, Suzanne Brogger made her family’s story the heart of her powerful novels and essays.

Book Club Meeting: "The Uncoupling"

Welcome to the JWA Book Club! We are excited to gather today to discuss Meg Wolitzer's best-selling novel, The Uncoupling.

When taking part in our comment-based discussion below, remember to hit "Show Reply" and "Show New Comments" to see the full conversation! Meg Wolitzer will be responding to questions mainly through the "reply" feature.

Here are some questions to consider before we begin:

1. How does The Uncoupling explore the ramifications of the loss of sexual desire?

2. What characters resonated most with you as a reader?

Lili Berger

Lili Berger’s experiences in the Holocaust heavily influenced her choices as a Yiddish writer and translator, focusing on the tensions outsiders face in different societies.

Hemdah Ben-Yehuda

Hemdah Ben-Yehuda collaborated with her husband, Eliezer Ben-Yehuda, to revive ancient Hebrew and make it a truly functional living language.

Netiva Ben Yehuda

Although she began her writing career very late in life, Netiva Ben Yehuda transformed the Israeli literary scene with her explosive Palmah trilogy.

Katja Behrens

Part of the first generation of postwar writers in Germany, Katja Behrens grapples with the often difficult relationship between German Jews and the majority.

Myriam Anissimov

Joking that she is a Yiddish writer working in French, novelist Myriam Anissimov has been celebrated for her portrayal of the difficulties faced by children of Holocaust survivors.

Anda Pinkerfeld Amir

Anda Pinkerfeld Amir helped shape two branches of Hebrew literature as an innovative, modernist Israeli poet and as a writer of children’s books that tackled difficult subjects like war and death.

Jane Yolen

Called the Hans Christian Anderson of America, Jane Yolen is known for weaving folklore, fantasy, historical events, and her own life into captivating stories for children and young adults.


How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Fiction." (Viewed on November 29, 2015) <>.


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