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Fiction

Eve Merriam

Eve Merriam mingled poetry for children with devastating social criticism for adults, like her Inner City Mother Goose, which became one of the most banned books of all time.

Alice Babette Toklas moves in permanently with Gertrude Stein.

September 9, 1910
Alice Babette Toklas heard distinct chiming when she met Gertrude Stein.

Marlee Matlin

Marlee Matlin made history in 1986 as both the youngest actress to win an Academy Award for Best Leading Actress and the first deaf person to win the award.

Lenore Guinzburg Marshall

A talented writer and poet in her own right, editor Lenore Guinzburg Marshall pushed her publishing company to publish William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury after it had been rejected by twelve other publishers.

Anna Margolin

Under the name Anna Margolin, Rosa Lebensboim wrote what critics called some of the finest Yiddish poetry of the earliest twentieth century.

Adeline Cohnfeldt Lust

Adeline Cohnfeldt Lust’s short stories for the New York Graphic were so popular that there were reprinted in newspapers across the country.

Sonia Levitin

Sonia Levitin mined both her personal history and major historical events for her award–winning books for children and young adults.

Elma Ehrlich Levinger

Elma Ehrlich Levinger helped strengthen the Jewish community through her leadership of Jewish women’s organizations, but her books for children and adults may have had an even greater impact on American Jews.

Blume Lempel

Told repeatedly from an early age that girls were not worth educating and that uneducated people couldn’t be writers, Blume Lempel defied expectations to write beautiful, unusually modernist Yiddish literature.

Malka Lee

Malka Lee’s lyrical Yiddish poems won over both critics and general American Jewish audiences, but it was her work dedicated to the family she lost in the Holocaust that had the most lasting impact.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Fiction." (Viewed on February 1, 2015) <http://jwa.org/topics/fiction>.

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