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Fashion and Beauty

Fashion, Feminism, and A Winter Formal

In my hometown, December means more than just early evenings and the optimism  of an impending winter break. It takes on significance beyond any of the holidays, concerts or changes in the weather. Instead, December means Cotillion, the prom-like event that has groups of high school students talking endlessly of dresses and limousines, pre-parties and after-parties, and definitely not the etiquette that the dance is supposed to teach. 

Cotillion

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A cotillion.

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Creative Commons (attribution non-commercial share alike)

A cotillion.

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Corset On, Corset Off

For most of my life, my fashion sense has been dictated more by what I don’t want to wear than what I do want to wear. Socks with seams? Nope. Tight jeans? No way. Itchy sweaters? Out of the question! I feel almost nothing towards clothes, and when I do feel anything, it is usually frustration at tedious trips to the mall and or the seamstress shop. Sure, I enjoy looking “good.” But I have never really had any idea what “good” actually means.

Corset Illustration

the_imperial_summer_corset_ca1890.gif

An illustration of a corset on a woman.

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Creative Commons (attribution non-commercial share alike)

An illustration of a corset on a woman.

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Fashionably Frustrated: Confessions of a Shop-o-Phobic

I was leading the feminist crusade toward an era where women would be judged not by the cuteness of their clothing but the content of their character. I, clad in ill-fitting yet fully functional attire, was the ascetic monk of the religion of Not Caring What Other People Think.

Historic Fashion

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Illustration showcasing historic women's fashion.
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Public Domain

Illustration showcasing historic women's fashion.

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“ . . . So Then I Started Wearing Army Pants and Flip Flops”

It was sixth grade when I started to feel like a child among women. Up until that point my wardrobe had consisted mostly of gaucho pants, t-shirts, and Converse sneakers, which suited my perfectly boyish body. But the dreaded halls of middle school eventually caught up with me and walking into school the first day I was caught up in a flurry of flowery perfume, tight leggings clung to early curves, lip gloss, and straightened hair flipping over shoulders. Hormones were raging and silly crushes became relationships while“hook up” was introduced into my vocabulary.      

Sally Milgrim

Sally Milgrim flourished not only as a successful department store owner but as one of the foremost fashion designers of her day, creating gowns for Broadway stars and First Ladies alike.

Fashion: A Double-Edged Sword

When I shop for clothes, I try to purchase tops that are not exceedingly cropped, low-cut, or sheer. I can’t count the number of times I’ve been excited about a cute dress or shirt, only to flip it over and find that the back is completely cut out. This is disappointing, but it also makes me question my own tendency to judge the Girl with the Crop Top. If the majority of clothes at the mall are cut out, cut-up pieces of fabric, it might not be fair to judge consumers for buying what is being sold.

Miniskirt

miniskirt_3-1.jpg
miniskirts and crop tops, oh my!
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Creative Commons (attribution non-commercial share alike)

miniskirts and crop tops, oh my!

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Fashion and Beauty." (Viewed on May 28, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/fashion-and-beauty>.

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