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Family

Galit Breen and Her Husband at Their Wedding

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Galit Breen and her husband at their wedding.

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Galit Breen and her husband at their wedding.

Galit Breen with Her Family

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Galit Breen with her family.

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JWA use only on jwa.org

Galit Breen with her family.

Olick Family, circa 1967

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Marv, Alice, and their children, Easter circa 1967.

Marv, Alice, and their children, Easter circa 1967.

Alice and Marv Olick in Dillingen, Germany 1953-1954

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Alice and Marv in Dillingen, Germany 1953-1954.

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Alice and Marv in Dillingen, Germany 1953-1954.

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Lauren Shapiro with her Aunt Jennie, cropped

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Lauren Shapiro with her Aunt Jennie.

Lauren Shapiro with her Aunt Jennie.

Lauren Shapiro with her Aunt Jennie near the Grotto

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Lauren Shapiro with her Aunt Jennie near the Grotto.

Lauren Shapiro with her Aunt Jennie near the Grotto.

“Can We Throw the Skirt Out?” A First-Generation Story

I am first generation American, as were most children and, for that matter, many of the teachers, in our public school. Not coincidentally, the word perseverance appeared often on our vocabulary lists. We used it in sentences, like “If you don’t have perseverance, you will not amount to much”—but I already knew that before I started kindergarten. Perseverance was my Aunt Jennie’s word of the day, every day. 

Children in Gorbals, Glasgow

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Children in a courtyard in the Gorbals, Glasgow, by an unknown photographer. The author's father Sam is the little one in the front looking to the side, her uncle Ben is in the first row, far left and third from left is her uncle Harry. Fay stands at the center of the photograph holding Max, who died at age eight in America.
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Other license (see note)

Children in a courtyard in the Gorbals, Glasgow, by an unknown photographer. The author's father Sam is the little one in the front looking to the side, her uncle Ben is in the first row, far left and third from left is her uncle Harry. Fay stands at the center of the photograph holding Max, who died at age eight in America.

Lauren Shapiro with her Aunt Jennie

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In front of the Lauren Shapiro's home in the Pelham Parkway housing projects with her Aunt Jennie.
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JWA use only on jwa.org

In front of the Lauren Shapiro's home in the Pelham Parkway housing projects with her Aunt Jennie.

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Rachel King on Shari Lewis, 2015

This Week in History: On August 2, 1998, children's television mainstay Shari Lewis died. Rachel King discusses why Lewis's most famous creation, Lamb Chop, continues to have such enduring appeal.
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Creative Commons (attribution)

This Week in History: On August 2, 1998, children's television mainstay Shari Lewis died. Rachel King discusses why Lewis's most famous creation, Lamb Chop, continues to have such enduring appeal.

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Jewish Women's Archive. "Family." (Viewed on May 5, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/family>.

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