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Entrepreneurs

The Lives They Lived: Jewish women to remember in 2011

“[Debbie Friedman] emphasized the value of every voice and the power of song to help us express ourselves and become our best selves. As she wrote for JWA's online exhibit Jewish Women and the Feminist Revolution: 'The more our voices are heard in song, the more we become our lyrics, our prayers, and our convictions.' The woman who wrote the song that asks God to 'help us find the courage to make our lives a blessing' herself modeled for us what that looks like.”—Judith Rosenbaum.
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Bette Berman Arnold, 1921 - 2011

These reminiscences are adapted from remarks given by Judith Cowin at her mother’s graveside service on May 26, 2011.

Tillie Lewis: More than just about tomatoes

One of the ingredients that is a staple in my kitchen cupboard is canned tomatoes. I will almost always have a can or two around in case I decide I want to make a quick tomato sauce or a pizza, and I especially rely on them throughout the majority of the year when local tomatoes are unavailable. Yet I recently realized that throughout the process of buying, using and consuming these tomatoes, I never stopped to think about their history and how they came to be the product we know today.

Sylvia Willard, 1922 - 2006

Sylvia’s father, David Shapiro, grew up in Middlebury, VT. In 1917 he opened Shapiro’s Department Store in nearby Brandon. Her mother, Katie, was raised in North Adams, MA, and it was during a visit to her family that Sylvia was born in 1922. As children, Sylvia and her sister Evelyn helped at the family’s store and played in and around the streets of Brandon.

Remembering the Triangle fire: The picnic that saved my grandmother's life

My grandmother, Anna Palevsky Shomsky, was born in Kobrin, the great, great granddaughter of the Kobriner Rebbi. Her family was well educated, wealthy and religious.

Carla Furstenberg Cohen, 1936 - 2010

This appeared on the Politics and Prose website shortly after her death.

by Barbara Meade

In the last months of her illness, I chided Carla for abandoning her devoted bookselling community, including me, by dying. I was not only losing a cherished friend, but both a partner and a partnership as well.

Marcia Soloski Levin, 1921 - 2010

Marcia Soloski Levin shared the story of many women who left their families to enter the working world in the 1940s. This included settling in a large city, earning a living, taking care of herself, marrying, and having a family.

Madeleine Stern, 1912 - 2007

Madeleine Stern was a renowned antiquarian book dealer, but her most important discovery was not a book at all. It was a series of lurid stories, all published in gaudy popular journals, all written under a pseudonym, all by New England's fresh and hearty Louisa May Alcott.

Betty Lee Hahn, 1932 - 2006

[Denver]…Her friends and family called her "Buz"—something different, unique, one-of-a-kind. Not that Betty Lee Hahn, a pillar of the Jewish community in Denver, Colorado and beyond, needed an out-of-the-ordinary name to stand out.

The story that might paint the best picture of Buz was the one-woman revolt she staged while in college at University of Texas. It wasn't uncommon at a place like that, and in a time like the '50s, for a sorority girl to be expected to wear certain kinds of clothes and avoid certain others.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Entrepreneurs." (Viewed on December 20, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/entrepreneurs>.

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