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Entrepreneurs

Carla Furstenberg Cohen, 1936 - 2010

This appeared on the Politics and Prose website shortly after her death.

by Barbara Meade

In the last months of her illness, I chided Carla for abandoning her devoted bookselling community, including me, by dying. I was not only losing a cherished friend, but both a partner and a partnership as well.

Marcia Soloski Levin, 1921 - 2010

Marcia Soloski Levin shared the story of many women who left their families to enter the working world in the 1940s. This included settling in a large city, earning a living, taking care of herself, marrying, and having a family.

Madeleine Stern, 1912 - 2007

Madeleine Stern was a renowned antiquarian book dealer, but her most important discovery was not a book at all. It was a series of lurid stories, all published in gaudy popular journals, all written under a pseudonym, all by New England's fresh and hearty Louisa May Alcott.

Betty Lee Hahn, 1932 - 2006

[Denver]…Her friends and family called her "Buz"—something different, unique, one-of-a-kind. Not that Betty Lee Hahn, a pillar of the Jewish community in Denver, Colorado and beyond, needed an out-of-the-ordinary name to stand out.

The story that might paint the best picture of Buz was the one-woman revolt she staged while in college at University of Texas. It wasn't uncommon at a place like that, and in a time like the '50s, for a sorority girl to be expected to wear certain kinds of clothes and avoid certain others.

Beatrice Alexander

"Madame" Beatrice Alexander knew how to dream big. Born into a world in which many women worked but few achieved prominence in business, she built her own company virtually singlehandedly. Raised amidst teeming poverty, she amassed a significant fortune. From the obscurity of an immigrant neighborhood, she became one of the foremost female entrepreneurs of the twentieth century.

Esther Kasle Jones, 1915 - 1994

"Mention the one thing that's most memorable about my mother?" What an impossible assignment! "Let me tell you what other people have told me about my mother instead," I said.

The New York Times profiles Kosher food matriarch Regina Margareten at age 95

December 24, 1957

Regina Margareten, the "matriarch of the Kosher food industry," was profiled in the "New York Times" the day before her 95th birthday.

Tillie Lewis opens cannery for American-grown Italian tomatoes

July 13, 1935

Tillie Lewis, who introduced Italian tomatoes to America, opened the first cannery owned by a woman on her 34th birthday.

Jennie Grossinger Day!

June 16, 1968

Governor Nelson Rockefeller designated Jennie Grossinger Day in New York State, the first time this honor was bestowed on a living woman.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Entrepreneurs." (Viewed on November 25, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/entrepreneurs>.

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