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Entrepreneurs

Regina Margareten

Regina Margareten was hailed as the “Matzah Queen” and the “matriarch of the kosher food industry” for both her business sense and her innovations to improve the quality of her products.

Sadie Loewith

Sadie Loewith was thirty years old before she was allowed to vote, but took on leadership roles in business and local government and fought to ensure other women could do the same.

Nancy Lieberman-Cline

Hailed as one of the greats of women’s basketball, Nancy Lieberman-Cline set a record as the youngest Olympic medalist in basketball and was inducted into multiple sports halls of fame.

Judith Leiber

Judith Leiber carved a unique place for herself in the world of fashion as the designer of some of the most inventive and sought-after handbags in the world.

Ruth Mosko Handler

Ruth Mosko Handler is best known as the inventor of the Barbie doll, but her most important work may be her prosthetics for survivors of breast cancer.

Jennie Grossinger

Jennie Grossinger became the driving force behind the famed Catskills resort referred to as “Waldorf on the Hudson.”

Sonia Delaunay

Through her art and work, Sonia Delaunay blurred the lines between poetry, fashion, and fine art.

Beatrice Fox Auerbach

Beatrice Fox Auerbach ran her family’s department store, G. Fox and Company, for thirty years, introducing innovations to customer service and helping women and minorities climb the corporate ladder.

Polly Adler

Notorious for her connections with gangsters at the height of Prohibition, Polly Adler fought to become “the best goddam madam in all America.”

Anna Marks

Anna Rich Marks was born in Russian-occupied Poland in 1847. Raised in poverty and haunted by the constant threat of pogroms, she left Poland and traveled to England where she met and married Wolff Marks in 1862, at age fifteen. The couple ventured to America, eventually settling in Eureka City, a rich mining area sixty miles south of Salt Lake City. Anna Marks made her fortune in real estate. She owned controlling interests in two mines near Eureka and was known to have invested money in diamonds as well. Anna Marks died of a heart attack in Eureka City on April 19, 1912.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Entrepreneurs." (Viewed on July 28, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/entrepreneurs>.

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