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Civil Service

Ruth Messinger Proclaims February 15, 1995 as Anna Sokolow Day

Ruth Messinger speaks to a crows and proclaims February 15th, 1995 as Anna Sokolow Day, in honor of the legendary dance icon.
Courtesy of the Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center
Ruth Messinger speaks to a crows and proclaims February 15th, 1995 as Anna Sokolow Day, in honor of the legendary dance icon.
Courtesy of the Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center

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Ruth Abrams, 2001

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Ruth Abrams, the first female justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, July, 2001.
Ruth Abrams, the first female justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, July, 2001.

Jewish Women's Congress Proceedings, Chicago, 1893, page 2

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Second page of the table of contents from the published proceedings of the Jewish Women's Congress in Chicago, 1893.
Second page of the table of contents from the published proceedings of the Jewish Women's Congress in Chicago, 1893.

Jewish Women's Congress Proceedings, Chicago, 1893, page 1

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First page of the table of contents from the published proceedings of the Jewish Women's Congress in Chicago, 1893.
First page of the table of contents from the published proceedings of the Jewish Women's Congress in Chicago, 1893.

Newspaper Article About Justine Wise Polier

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This newspaper article explains how Justine Wise Polier (Tulin) almost lost her position. When General Johnson, New York's "economic czar," announced that "welfare people" were "loafers" who belonged in jail, Polier denounced him. LaGuardia threatened that he would not renew her appointment. Polier refused to recant, and eventually the mayor relented, swearing her in as a permanent judge.
Institution: Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University
This newspaper article explains how Justine Wise Polier (Tulin) almost lost her position. When General Johnson, New York's "economic czar," announced that "welfare people" were "loafers" who belonged in jail, Polier denounced him. LaGuardia threatened that he would not renew her appointment. Polier refused to recant, and eventually the mayor relented, swearing her in as a permanent judge.
Institution: Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University

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Mazel tov, Chai Feldblum

On Monday, President Obama announced his nomination for Commissioner of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and I couldn't be happier about his pick: Chai Feldblum, Professor of Law at Georgetown, who also happens to be an out Jewish lesbian.

Rose Schneiderman

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Rose Schneiderman speaking at a union rally, circa 1910s. 
Courtesy of Brown Brothers
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Rose Schneiderman speaking at a union rally, circa 1910s. 
Courtesy of Brown Brothers

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Elena Kagan confirmed by U.S. Senate as first woman Solicitor General of the United States

March 19, 2009

The U.S. Senate confirmed Elena Kagan as the first woman Solicitor General of the United States.

'Feisty, Jewish grandmother' to run for Lieutenant Governor of NJ

New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine (Dem) has picked Loretta Weinberg to be his running mate for lieutenant governor.  The JTA reports that this "marks the first time a Jewish woman is running for state-wide office in New Jersey."

The JTA article does not paint a pretty picture of the history of women in New Jersey politics.

Sotomayor and other "firsts"

Yesterday morning, as I heard the news that Obama would imminently announce Sonia Sotomayor as his nominee for the Supreme Court, my eyes welled with tears. I thought about the Latino and Latina kids who will grow up knowing that they, too, can serve on the highest bench, and also thought about the older people in the Latino community who undoubtedly feel pride and a sense of communal achievement.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Civil Service." (Viewed on May 1, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/civil-service>.

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