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Civil Service

Helen Suzman, 1959

helen_suzman.jpg
Helen Suzman in 1959.
Courtesy of the Barnard Center for Research on Women.
Rights
Creative Commons (attribution non-commercial share alike)
Contributor: Submitter
Benson, Stephen

Helen Suzman in 1959.

Courtesy of the Barnard Center for Research on Women.

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Female United States Senators, 2009

senate_women_march_2009.jpg
Portrait of the 17 female United States Senators as of March 2009.
Photo by the United States Senate
Rights
Public Domain
Contributor: Owner
United States Senate
Contributor: Institution
United States Senate
Portrait of the 17 female United States Senators as of March 2009.
Photo by the United States Senate

"Jurist with Attitude" Celebrates 19 Years on Supreme Court

If you are under the age of 20, there’s never been a time in your life when a Jewish woman hasn’t been sitting on the Supreme Court of the United States.

Why are there so many prominent Jewish pro-choicers in politics?

Michigan State Representative Lisa Brown has become a new heroine of the pro-choice movement, and she achieved this status both by invoking her Judaism and by using the word “vagina” on the State House Floor, during a heated debate of an omnibus anti-abortion bill.

Michigan state Rep. Lisa Brown: Jewish superhero for abortion

Michigan state Rep. Lisa Brown is a champion. A hero. A "Jewess with Attitude" to the n'th degree. 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg—a fitting culmination for Jewish American Heritage Month

As you know if you read the Jewish Women’s Archive blog, May is Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM).

Ruth Bader Ginsburg from MAKERS

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
Courtesy of "MAKERS: Women Who Make America"
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
Courtesy of "MAKERS: Women Who Make America"

Related content:

Lillie Steinhorn

steinhorn-lillie-by-joan-roth.jpg
Lillie Steinhorn.
Photo by Joan Roth.
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Lillie Steinhorn.
Photo by Joan Roth.

Related content:

Sheila Cheimets , 1936 - 2011

Sheila Cheimets ran for Canton’s Board of Selectmen in 1972 after the women’s movement had emerged as a national force. A mother of three young boys, she wore plaid bellbottoms and had just lost her job as managing editor of the Canton Reporter, because the newspaper folded.

One potential voter shook her hand, wished her luck, and told her he would not vote for her because she was a woman.

“I thought it was strange,’’ she told the Globe in a 1974 interview. “I can’t imagine a woman saying anything like that to a man.’’

Sheila Cheimets circa 1966

s_cheimets_c._1966.jpeg
Politician Sheila Cheimets in Canton, MA, circa 1966.
Courtesy of Peter Cheimets
Rights
JWA use only on jwa.org
Politician Sheila Cheimets in Canton, MA, circa 1966.
Courtesy of Peter Cheimets

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Civil Service." (Viewed on February 7, 2016) <http://jwa.org/topics/civil-service>.

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