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Art

Ruth Weisberg

Ruth Weisberg’s art helped bring the Reform Movement’s Open Door Haggadah to life with inclusive, feminist imagery.

Joan Snyder

Joan Snyder’s abstract expressionist paintings, often created using unconventional materials and techniques, ushered in a new era of feminist art.

Joan Roth

Through her photography, Joan Roth captured powerful and unexpected images of women—from homeless women in New York to Ethiopian Jews being airlifted to Israel.

Deena Metzger

Deena Metzger’s iconic portrait, “The Warrior,” changed the way we look at surviving breast cancer.

Diana Mara Henry

Diana Mara Henry photographed some of the most important events in the women’s movement, including the iconic image of the march to the First National Women’s Conference in Houston.

Judy Chicago

Judy Chicago vividly depicted women’s history and women’s experiences through sculpture, paintings, and installation art that involved hundreds of collaborators.

Gay Block

Gay Block’s photography allowed her to explore surprising facets of her subjects, from girls at summer camp to Holocaust survivors to her own mother.

Helène Aylon

Through her art, Helène Aylon explored the intersectionality among her feminism, the Orthodox Judaism of her upbringing, and her place in a war-torn world.

Rebecca Yenawine

Rebecca Yenawine’s unorthodox approach to a group of teenage vandals led her to create a unique art school for inner city kids.

Betsy Shure Gross

Betsy Shure Gross’s love of nature and open spaces led her to restore a local treasure: the last surviving linear park designed by Frederick Law Olmstead.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Art." (Viewed on August 2, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/art>.

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