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Art

Androgynous artist Gluck is born

August 13, 1895

The artist Gluck's will to define herself by her own standards extended not only to her name, but also to every aspect of her life.

Celia Dropkin

Celia Dropkin defied both social and artistic conventions with her sensual, free-verse, Yiddish poetry.

Sylvia Goulston Dreyfus

Sylvia Goulston Dreyfus worked to improve Boston both through community activism and through her support of art and music.

Stella Drabkin

A talented painter and mosaicist who also innovated new methods of printmaking, Stella Drabkin believed the mark of an artist was their ability to work in any medium, guided by the needs of their art. Drabkin worked as a commercial artist before studying at the Philadelphia Graphic Sketch Club, where she created a series of prints in the 1930s called Old Philadelphia, which depicted street scenes in working-class, ethnic neighborhoods.

Maya Deren

Maya Deren became one of the most important avant-garde filmmakers of her time for her use of experimental editing techniques and her fascination with ecstatic religious dances.

Lucille Corcos

Lucille Corcos was celebrated as one of the foremost “modern primitivist” painters in America, creating scenes where the outside walls of buildings fell away to reveal the lives of those within.

Jo Copeland

Starting her career at a time when American fashion slavishly copied Paris designs, Jo Copeland created glamorous outfits that were uniquely American.

Etta Cone

With her sister Claribel, Etta Cone amassed one of the largest private art collections in the world, becoming a major supporter of artists like Matisse and Picasso.

Claribel Cone

Claribel Cone made contributions to two vastly different fields as a biologist and a patron of modern French art.

Katherine M. Cohen

Defying biblical prohibitions against graven images, Katherine M. Cohen created sculptures that explored Jewish themes and earned respect in both American and European circles.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Art." (Viewed on November 27, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/art>.

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