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Activism

It Ain’t Easy Being A Feminist Sports Fan

It ain’t easy being a feminist sports fan.

Sure, we’ve got Mo’ne Davis and Serena Williams, Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Hope Solo, but it’s still a man’s world. The news headlines related to sports stars’ personal lives often bring up the cold hard truth: sports and feminism are a tough combination to make work.

Mount Holyoke, My Alma Mater, Giving ALL Women a Voice

It’s the time of the year for new beginnings, and many schools and universities are starting the 2014-2015 academic year this week. My alma mater, Mount Holyoke College, annually hosts Convocation, a welcoming ceremony celebrating new students and the graduating class with music, speeches by the College President among other esteemed professors and guests, and a picnic. Some of my fondest memories from my four years at MHC are from Convocations, but it looks like this year’s ceremony has left all of the others in the dust. 

Whose Labor Day Is It Anyway?

Ron Ashkenas’ recent post for Forbes about Labor Day has me feeling unsettled, and I finally know why. In his article, Ashkenas explains that the “real purpose [of Labor Day] was to serve as a tribute to the working class — the men and women whose physical, and largely manual, labor had built the country.” He goes on to bemoan (as we have in the past) how the meaning of Labor Day has been lost in end-of-summer soirees and all-American barbeques. So far, I’m totally onboard with his argument. We should find more meaningful ways to commemorate the people who built this country, brick by brick.

Dorothy Parker, Hopeful Cynic

“This memorial garden is dedicated to her noble spirit, which celebrated the oneness of humankind, and to the bonds of everlasting friendship between black and Jewish people.”

If you had to guess who this epitaph belonged to, who would you choose?  Lillian Wald? Dorothy Height?

Geri M. Joseph

Geri M. Joseph distinguished herself both as a journalist covering vital stories and as US ambassador to the Netherlands during a diplomatic crisis.

Marie Grunfeld Jastrow

It took until she was eighty-two for Marie Grunfeld Jastrow to find a publisher for her autobiographies, but her two compelling memoirs of coming of age as a Jewish immigrant in New York touched audiences deeply.

Elizabeth Holtzman

The youngest woman ever elected to Congress at age 32, Elizabeth Holtzman focused her political career on human rights.

Libby Holman

Torch singer Libby Holman was known as much for her scandalous personal life and revolutionary activism as for her lush voice.

Beth Bowman Hess

Beth Bowman Hess brought a humanist and feminist sensibility to gerontology by discussing the difficulties the elderly faced not as problems inherent in older people, but as problems in the social order that should be confronted and changed.

Bertha Beitman Herzog

Bertha Beitman Herzog’s leadership of women’s organizations in Cleveland created a safety net for women and children throughout the region.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Activism." (Viewed on September 20, 2014) <http://jwa.org/topics/activism>.

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