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Professor

Rose Laub Coser

Sociologist Rose Laub Coser redefined major concepts in role theory—the idea that our actions are largely dictated by our roles in society—and applied them to expectations of women’s roles in the family and the workplace.

Jo Copeland

Starting her career at a time when American fashion slavishly copied Paris designs, Jo Copeland created glamorous outfits that were uniquely American.

Claribel Cone

Claribel Cone made contributions to two vastly different fields as a biologist and a patron of modern French art.

Mildred Cohn

Biochemist Mildred Cohn used new technology to measure organic reactions in living cells.

Naomi W. Cohen

One of the first women scholars in the new field of Jewish studies, Naomi W. Cohen earned a reputation as one of the foremost historians of American Jewry.

Helen Louise Cohen

Helen Louise Cohen made modern and classic plays more accessible to high school students around the country through her widely used anthologies.

Corinne Chochem

Corinne Chochem helped popularize Israeli folk dance as a choreographer, dance teacher, and the driving force behind albums of folk-dancing music.

Ruth Leah Bunzel

Anthropologist Ruth Leah Bunzel did groundbreaking work on the relationship of artists to their work and on alcoholism in Guatemala and Mexico.

Ruth Mack Brunswick

Psychoanalyst Ruth Mack Brunswick served as a crucial sounding board for Sigmund Freud, helping him revise his theories on the importance of the mother in the early shaping of the psyche.

Rosellen Brown

In her fiction, Rosellen Brown confronted themes of alienation, responsibility for others, and racial tension in America.

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Professor." (Viewed on October 1, 2014) <http://jwa.org/taxonomy/term/22375>.

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