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Social Worker

Lydia Rapoport

Lydia Rapoport’s contributions to crisis theory transformed how social workers and therapists handle crisis intervention.

Hellen Harris Perlman

Helen Harris Perlman pioneered the “Chicago School” of social work, arguing that many people in crisis needed short-term therapy and solutions rather than long-term Freudian analysis.

Alice Davis Menken

A descendent of prominent families whose American roots traced back before the Revolutionary War, Alice Davis Menken devoted her career to helping immigrant women and children get a fresh start.

Minnie Low

At a time when social work usually meant wealthy people donating to the poor, Minnie Low pushed for new kinds of aid such as vocational training and loans that made the needy self–sufficient.

Johanna Loeb

Johanna Loeb’s work with both Jewish and secular charities strengthened the safety net for the poor, the sick, and new immigrants throughout Chicago.

Alice Springer Fleisher Liveright

Alice Springer Fleisher Liveright helped turn social work from a volunteer activity to a trained, organized profession.

Susan Davis

Congresswoman Susan Davis, the first Democrat in more than fifty years to serve more than one term for California’s 53rd district, has repeatedly fought for women’s health issues on both a state and local level.

Rhoda Kaufman

Rhoda Kaufman helped create social welfare organizations throughout Georgia and overcame prejudice against her religion and gender to become one of the most respected social reformers in the country.

Gisela Peiper Konopka

Gisela Peiper Konopka ignored conventional wisdom and focused on what troubled teens had to say, a process that led to her becoming a pioneer of group therapy, rebuilding shattered German psyches after WWII.

Esther Loeb Kohn

Esther Loeb Kohn helped bridge the gap between Chicago’s volunteer and professional social workers and spent thirty years running the Hull House settlement whenever founder Jane Addams was away on her frequent travels.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Social Worker." (Viewed on January 31, 2015) <http://jwa.org/taxonomy/term/21863>.

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