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Social Worker

Rhoda Kaufman

Rhoda Kaufman helped create social welfare organizations throughout Georgia and overcame prejudice against her religion and gender to become one of the most respected social reformers in the country.

Gisela Peiper Konopka

Gisela Peiper Konopka ignored conventional wisdom and focused on what troubled teens had to say, a process that led to her becoming a pioneer of group therapy, rebuilding shattered German psyches after WWII.

Esther Loeb Kohn

Esther Loeb Kohn helped bridge the gap between Chicago’s volunteer and professional social workers and spent thirty years running the Hull House settlement whenever founder Jane Addams was away on her frequent travels.

C. Marian Kohn

Despite being legally blind from childhood due to cataracts, C. Marian Kohn worked tirelessly to help others in need, from orphans and immigrants to people with disabilities.

Laura Margolis Jarblum

Laura Margolis Jarblum’s deft management of wartime social services on three different continents for the Joint Distribution Committee saved the lives of thousands.

Blanche Frank Ittleson

Blanche Frank Ittleson’s pioneering work in treating and teaching mentally challenged and emotionally disturbed children opened new possibilities for struggling children and their families.

Anna Weiner Hochfelder

Anna Weiner Hochfelder used her legal expertise to help women’s groups serve their members more effectively.

Dorothy C. Kahn

During the Depression, Dorothy C. Kahn helped pioneer social work as a service provided by the government to all who needed it, instead of the responsibility of just private or religious charities.

Ruth E. Fizdale

Ruth E. Fizdale helped transform social work from a charitable volunteer activity to a paid profession through her development of a fee-for-service, nonprofit counseling firm.

Eleanor Glueck

Eleanor Glueck and her husband Sheldon did massive statistical modeling and follow-up studies to uncover the roots of criminal behavior, revolutionizing the field of criminology.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Social Worker." (Viewed on October 20, 2014) <http://jwa.org/taxonomy/term/21863>.

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