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Founder

Adrienne Cooper

Adrienne Cooper played a critical role in the revival of Yiddish music as founder of the Yiddish Folk Arts Program (KlezKamp), a group that brought together musicians, linguists, and anthropologists to recover the tradition of Klezmer.

Ethel Stark

As founder of the Montreal Women’s Symphony Orchestra, Ethel Stark broke down barriers, becoming the first woman to conduct an orchestra at Carnegie Hall in 1947 and welcoming Violet Grant States as the first black woman member of a Canadian symphony orchestra.

Lydia Rapoport

Lydia Rapoport’s contributions to crisis theory transformed how social workers and therapists handle crisis intervention.

Luise Rainer

Luise Rainer made history as both the first person to win multiple Academy Awards and the first to win them consecutively.

Josephine Wertheim Pomerance

Josephine Wertheim Pomerance spearheaded efforts for nuclear arms control as founder and head of the Committee for World Development and World Disarmament (CWDWD).

Shirley Polykoff

Shirley Polykoff became one of the top advertising executives of her day by crafting ad campaigns that transformed how Americans saw products from coffee to hair dye.

Virginia Morris Pollak

Virginia Morris Pollak’s artistic career and her longtime community service collided in WWII when she used her deep understanding of clay, plaster, and metal to revolutionize reconstructive surgery for wounded servicemen.

Seraphine Eppstein Pisko

As executive secretary and vice president of the National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives in Denver, Seraphine Eppstein Pisko was one of the first women to lead a national Jewish institution.

Rosalie Solomons Phillips

Between her family ties to the American Revolution, her political work, and her efforts as a founding member of Hadassah, Rosalie Solomons Phillips showed her deep concern for both preserving the past and creating a future for the Jewish people.

Rebecca Machado Phillips

Beyond mothering her many biological and adopted children, Rebecca Machado Phillips tended her community by founding soup kitchens and aid societies for the poor and sick.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Founder." (Viewed on January 30, 2015) <http://jwa.org/taxonomy/term/21663>.

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