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Etta Cone

Etta Cone

With her sister Claribel, Etta Cone amassed one of the largest private art collections in the world, becoming a major supporter of artists like Matisse and Picasso.

Miss Etta and Dr. Claribel: A new look into the lives of the Cone sisters

Growing up in Baltimore in the 1950s and 60s, we got our doses of high culture at the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Claribel Cone

Immortalized in drawings by French modernists Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse and in Gertrude Stein’s essay “Two Women,” Dr. Claribel Cone was well known in her day as a charming, dignified, well-informed, self-assured, idiosyncratic, and highly independent woman with two passions, medical research and collecting art and artifacts.

Etta Cone

Though her formal education ended when she graduated from Baltimore’s Western Female High School in 1887, Etta Cone, often overshadowed by her more flamboyant sister Claribel Cone, assembled with Claribel one of the major private art collections of the century. For years the sisters squeezed Matisses, Picassos, glorious textiles and period furniture into the apartments they maintained and graciously displayed on Eutaw Place in Baltimore. Outliving Claribel by twenty years, Etta bequeathed their joint collections to the Baltimore Museum of Art.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Etta Cone." (Viewed on December 21, 2014) <http://jwa.org/taxonomy/term/18209>.

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