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Rita Levi-Montalcini

Rita Levi-Montalcini

Rita Levi-Montalcini won the Nobel Prize for her work in discovering nerve growth factor, crucial for understanding neurodegenerative disorders like ALS, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s.

Virginia Holocaust Museum unveils plaque honoring Dr. Gertrude Elion

May 28, 2012

The Virginia Holocaust Museum in Richmond celebrated Jewish American Heritage Month by unveiling the Jewish-American Hall of Fame plaque honoring Nobel Prize Winner in Medicine Dr. Gertrude Elion.

Jewish women and the Nobel Prize

As the 2009 Nobel prizes are being handed out, many are fussing over Obama's Peace Prize -- does he deserve it, will this affect his approach with Iran, etc.  Important questions, certainly, but don't let them distract you from the real story this year: 2009 is a record year for women Nobel Prize-winners

Only 40 women have ever won the prestigious Nobel Prize, 5 of whom were awarded the prize this year, one of whom is Israeli Jewess Ada Yonath, winner of the Chemistry Prize.

Rita Levi-Montalcini wins the Nobel Prize

October 13, 1986

Rita Levi-Montalcini's pioneering work on nerve growth earned her the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Rita Levi-Montalcini

Born in Turin on April 22, 1909, Rita Levi-Montalcini was the daughter of Adamo Levi, an electrical engineer and mathematician, and Adele Montalcini, a painter. Her parents had four children—the eldest, Gino (b. 1902), who later became a well-known architect; Anna (b. 1904); and finally Rita and her twin sister Paola Levi-Montalcini, who became a well-known artist.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Rita Levi-Montalcini." (Viewed on October 21, 2014) <http://jwa.org/taxonomy/term/11612>.

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