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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsberg brought landmark cases for gender and racial equality before the Supreme Court, transforming the American legal landscape even before her historic appointment as the second-ever female Supreme Court justice.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was born in 1933 in Brooklyn, NY. She earned a scholarship to Cornell, where she graduated first in her class. She attended Harvard and then Columbia Law Schools, making Law Review at each and again graduating at the top of her class.

A few more stories for the road

As I prepare to leave my position as JWA’s Director of Public History after more than 12 years here, my mind keeps returning me back to the summer day in 2000 when I first stepped into the offices of the Jewish Women’s Archive. At the time, I was a disgruntled graduate student, disillusioned with life in the Ivory Tower and the academic study of women’s history. (Was a library really the best place to learn about women’s activism, I wondered?).

"Jurist with Attitude" Celebrates 19 Years on Supreme Court

If you are under the age of 20, there’s never been a time in your life when a Jewish woman hasn’t been sitting on the Supreme Court of the United States.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg—a fitting culmination for Jewish American Heritage Month

As you know if you read the Jewish Women’s Archive blog, May is Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM).

Justice Kagan's first year on the bench

Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan is inarguably a Jewess with attitude – not to mention clout and intelligence. Justice Kagan, who was sworn into office on August 7, 2010, has just wrapped up her first year as an Associate Justice on the country’s highest court, and what a year it’s been.

Why Rachel Berry deserves our compassion

Recently in The Forward, Jay Michaelson compared four characters from “Glee” to the “Four Children” from the Passover seder tradition. What I loved about the piece was Michaelson’s point that for young Jews, Jewish identity is one variable in a multi-variable identity that youth will embrace, when and if they find it meaningful. What bothered me about the piece was the language Michaelson used describing Rachel Berry, the analogous “Wise Child,” as an “irritating control freak” and “intolerable.” It was particularly difficult to read this because, well, I used to be Rachel Berry.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg tells it like it is

If you haven't read it already, check out this excellent NYT interview with Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg -- a JWA hero -- by Emily Bazelon (a senior editor at Slate, a founder of their new online women's magazine, Double X, and a serious Jewess with Attitude in her own right).

Celebrating 350 years of Jewish women in America

October 18, 2004

The Jewish Women's Archive joined with National Women's Philanthropy for an historic celebration of 350 years of Jewish women in America at the International Lion of Judah conference.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg joins U.S. Supreme Court

August 10, 1993

Ruth Bader Ginsburg took her seat as an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Ruth Bader Ginsburg." (Viewed on September 21, 2014) <http://jwa.org/taxonomy/term/10627>.

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