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Susan Weidman Schneider

Susan Weidman Schneider

As founder and editor of Lilith magazine, Susan Weidman Schneider created a space for Jewish feminists to discuss issues that deeply affected them.

Susan Weidman Schneider

Susan Weidman Schneider is a founding mother of Lilith, the award-winning Jewish women’s magazine, where she has been Editor–in–Chief since its debut in 1976. The magazine, and her writing and lectures, are often credited with changing the way Jewish women see themselves and their roles in the Jewish community.

Publication of "Jewish and Female"

June 1, 1984

Susan Weidman Schneider published "Jewish and Female: Choices and Changes in Our Lives Today."

Susan Weidman Schneider

The covers of Lilith magazine fill the walls of Susan Weidman Schneider’s office. They tell much of her story: Decades of commitment to the causes of Jewish women. Through her editorship of Lilith, her books, her writings in other publications and her activism, she has participated in and documented nothing less than a revolution in Jewish women’s lives.

Philanthropy in the United States

Jewish law and custom, secular culture, and economic and social roles have shaped Jewish women’s involvement in philanthropic activities. Although the term is often associated with the beneficence of the wealthy, philanthropy refers to a broad range of activities—giving time as well as giving money—that are intended to enhance the quality of life in a community or a society.

Lilith Magazine

Founded in 1976 by a small group of women led by Susan Weidman Schneider “to foster discussion of Jewish women’s issues and put them on the agenda of the Jewish community, with a view to giving women—who are more than fifty percent of the world’s Jews—greater choice in Jewish life,” Lilith: The Independent Jewish Women’s Magazine has remained true to its mission. From its inception, it has intentionally, though not exclusively, emphasized religious and social issues, with somewhat less focus on areas such as economics or politics. In 2004 the editors changed the tag line on the cover to read “independent, Jewish & frankly feminist.” The contours of the Jewish women’s movement and its own consciousness of a role that exceeds that of a magazine can be traced through nearly three decades of publication.

Jewish Feminism in the United States

Challenging all varieties of American Judaism, feminism has been a powerful force for popular Jewish religious revival. Of America’s four Jewish denominations, all but the Orthodox have accepted women as rabbis and cantors.

Female Purity (Niddah) Annotated Bibliography

Annotated bibliography of books about female purity (niddah).

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Susan Weidman Schneider." (Viewed on September 18, 2014) <http://jwa.org/taxonomy/term/10090>.

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