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Yiddish Literature

Yiddish: Women's Participation in Eastern European Yiddish Press (1862-1903)

The Yiddish press was welcomed by Jewish women, as it allowed them to move from the domestic into the public sphere and to have an impact upon the latter. Immediately upon the press’s appearance, women submitted correspondence and translations of foreign literary works.

Yudica

Yudica was the pseudonym of Yehudit Zik, a poet whose reputation in Yiddish literature was largely developed during her three decades in Canada.

Ruth R. Wisse

As a scholar and a literary and social critic, Ruth R. Wisse is a unique figure in American Jewish letters. She bridges the worlds of Yiddish and American culture, of literature and politics, and of Israel and the [jwa_encyclopedia_glossary:308]diaspora[/jwa_encyclopedia_glossary].

Malka Heifetz Tussman

Malka Heifetz Tussman served as a bridge between the generations of Yiddish poets who emigrated from Eastern Europe and of those American-born Jewish poets who have taken up the task of making Yiddish poetry known to a readership that knows little Yiddish.

Chava Turniansky

Professor Chava Turniansky is a leading scholar of Old Yiddish, which she views not just as the vernacular of fourteenth to eighteenth century Jewish society, but as a vehicle for understanding the literary, philological, historical and sociological mores of the period.

Rivke Bas Me’ir Tiktiner

Rivke bas Me’ir Tiktiner, a preacher and teacher for women, was the first woman author of a Yiddish book, the moral homiletic Meineket Rivkah (Meinekes Rivke, Rebekah’s Nurse, 1609).

Chava Slucka-Kesten

As a writer from the perspective of a politically engaged woman, Slucka-Kesten offers a unique glimpse into pre- and post-war Jewish life in Poland’s cities and villages, as well as into the early years of the State of Israel; there are few such women’s voices.

Dora Shulner

From a literary as well as historical standpoint, the work of Dora Shulner is of interest for its portrayal of Jewish women in the Russian Pale during the first two decades of the twentieth century. Drawing on her own life experience, Shulner wrote about war and revolution, dislocation and suffering, adventure and romance, loneliness and loss.

Esther Shumiatcher-Hirschbein

In December 1918, while he was on a speaking tour which brought him to Calgary, Esther Shumiatcher met and married Peretz Hirschbein (1880–1948), a leading playwright in New York’s Yiddish theater. Encouraged by her husband, Shumiatcher, who had previously written but apparently not published poetry in English, now turned to Yiddish.

Fradel Shtok

Fradel Shtok holds a place among the pioneers of modern Yiddish literature for her treatment of the inner sensual lives of Jewish women. Although her work showed great promise, her career as a Yiddish writer was brief.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Yiddish Literature." (Viewed on December 28, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/yiddish-literature>.

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