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Women's Education

Esther Herrman

Esther Mendels Herrman’s generosity helped create many vital Jewish and secular institutions, from Barnard College to the 92nd Street Y.

Carol Ruth Silver

Carol Ruth Silver was the first white woman to be jailed in the Freedom Rides, an experience that sparked a career in law and politics, fighting for the rights of others.

Mathilde Schechter

Mathilde Roth Schechter was both an essential support for her husband’s work as president of the Jewish Theological Seminary and a force in her own right as founder of the Women’s League.

Nacha Rivkin

Nacha Rivkin transformed education for Orthodox girls by utilizing new models of education at the girls’ yeshiva she helped found.

Elsa Neumann

Elsa Neumann earned a doctorate in physics from the University of Berlin in 1899, nine years before women were officially allowed to study there, becoming the university’s first woman graduate.

Annie Nathan Meyer

Believing that education was the best path for women’s success, Annie Nathan Meyer founded Barnard College, New York’s first liberal arts college for women.

Belda Lindenbaum

Belda Lindenbaum was driven by the birth of her daughters to create new opportunities for Jewish women and girls.

Hannah Greenebaum Solomon

In creating the first national association for Jewish women, Hannah Greenebaum Solomon redefined the roles they could play in American society.

Shirley G. Bridge

One of Washington State’s first female pharmacists, Shirley was born in Seattle’s Swedish Hospital in 1922. She practiced pharmacology until she retired at age 66, and with her husband, Herb, raised two children. A pioneer on many fronts, Shirley was one of the first Jewish women to become a member of the Women’s University Club. A passionate and indefatigable supporter of women’s and health issues, Shirley survived five primary cancers and was a no-nonsense pragmatist venerated for getting things done.

Girl Rising

Abby Mohr lives a stone's throw away from Boston, but her take on education is global. Barely even in her teenage years, and she cares deeply about making sure girls all over the world can get an education. “I really like school,” she says. “Boys get to go to school all over the world, and girls should too.” Most teenagers probably do not realize just how lucky they are to be educated, but Abby is not one of them.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Women's Education." (Viewed on September 22, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/womens-education>.

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