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Translation

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky, 1926 - 2012

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky’s parents immigrated to the United States from Poland around the turn of the last century. Early in their marriage, they made an unsuccessful try at farming and then operated a hand laundry on New York’s Lower East Side. With the help of a land grant from Jewish charities set up for that purpose, they tried again, joining a community of Jewish farmers in Farmingdale, NJ.

Dorrit Zucker Cohn, 1924 - 2012

As I recollect my relationship with Dorrit Cohn, what I come up with is not a continuous narrative, but a chain of discrete moments, encounters, and images. I knew Dorrit from a distance — the distance separating a very young graduate student and a senior scholar. When I began to assemble these encounters, and to recollect some of our conversations, I realized that they added up to something truly significant: the enormous impact she had on my life.

Lily Edelman

Lily Edelman made great contributions to multiculturalism and Jewish education through her writing and teaching.

Celia Dropkin

Celia Dropkin defied both social and artistic conventions with her sensual, free-verse, Yiddish poetry.

Beatrice Berler

Beatrice Berler went back to school at age 45, becoming an award-winning translator of Spanish novels and history as well as an activist for adult literacy.

Bertha Badt-Strauss

Bertha Badt-Strauss used her writing to create a broader range of possible identities for women in the cultural Zionist movement called the Jewish Renaissance.

Babette Deutsch

In her poetry, novels, and translations, Babette Deutsch interwove elements of vastly different cultures and times, from the Bible and Shakespeare to Russian and Japanese literature.

Marcia Falk

Marcia Falk transformed the art of prayer with feminist blessings and modern translations of ancient writing.

Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus’s famous poem “The New Colossus” helped the Statue of Liberty greet millions, but still reflected her experience of the mixed welcome that minorities faced in America.

Ruth Emmerman Peizer, 1923 - 2013

Ruth Emmerman Peizer passed away peacefully on October 23, 2013. Ms. Peizer left an indelible mark on the Jewish community as a Yiddish authority in Seattle. She shared her passion and expertise in literary Yiddish by teaching classes at the University of Washington, Jewish Education Council, Hebrew High School, and Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Translation." (Viewed on July 29, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/translation>.

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