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Oral History

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky, 1926 - 2012

Gertrude Wishnick Dubrovsky’s parents immigrated to the United States from Poland around the turn of the last century. Early in their marriage, they made an unsuccessful try at farming and then operated a hand laundry on New York’s Lower East Side. With the help of a land grant from Jewish charities set up for that purpose, they tried again, joining a community of Jewish farmers in Farmingdale, NJ.

Remembering and Healing Together

What does it mean to remember together?

Silence. That’s what I remember. Silence coated in hazy sunshine and a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach.

I spent most of the week of the Boston Marathon Bombing feeling alone—at my desk at work, on the couch or laying in bed at home. I woke the day of the lockdown to the news on WBUR coming from my alarm clock and I sat quietly, anxiously, in my apartment all day. I heard nothing outside, no sirens or cars or people shouting in the alley outside my window. It was totally surreal. I didn’t sleep well for weeks after that happened. I felt scared and alone.

Sharing stories, inspiring change

Last week, Rabbi Scott Perlo wrote a provocative article in the Washington Post in which he addressed the continuing discomfort that many Jews—even liberal, gender-equity-supporting ones—feel about female rabbis. He suggests that this puzzling phenomenon may be due to the central place nostalgia holds in many people’s feelings about Judaism. It comes as no surprise that this nostalgic vision does not include female rabbis.

JWA releases "D.C. Stories": A new oral history exhibit for Jewish American Heritage Month

On April 20, 2006, President George W. Bush officially proclaimed May Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM) to recognize Jewish contributions to American culture over the past 350+ years. President Obama’s 2011 proclamation declares that “this month, we embrace and celebrate the vast contributions Jewish Americans have made to our country… We remember that the history and unique identity of Jewish Americans is part of the grand narrative of our country…”

Entitlement and its Discontents

This week, New York Magazine’s cover features an oral history of Ms. Magazine, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary.

Adina Back, 1958 - 2008

Adina Back, a devoted and talented public historian, believed in history as the story of all peoples, and worked throughout her life to reveal the voices of those whose contributions to social change had previously gone unrecognized and untold.  Her fierce commitment to locating and interviewing these “heroes” and helping to reclaim their lost stories, was evident in three decades of research, writing, and activism.

Update from JWA's Institute for Educators

On Sunday afternoon, 23 women and one [brave] man arrived in suburban Boston to spend four days at JWA’s 2011 summer Institute for Educators.

Lani Silver, 1948 - 2009

Most of us have a standard job or freelance career. Silver's "job" was working as a passionate activist with a breathtaking list of passionate and important causes. She even listed her occupation on Facebook as an activist.

Frances Feldman, 1912 - 2008

Frances Lomas Feldman was born in Philadelphia on December 3, 1912 to Jewish immigrants from Ukraine. The youngest of six children, she moved with her family to Los Angeles when she was eight years old, and remained a lifelong Angelino.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Oral History." (Viewed on August 30, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/oral-history>.

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