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New York Times

Rose Rosenberg: A Young Jewish Woman Behind the Scenes of No.10 Downing Street

Rose Rosenberg represents so many women whose names are lost to history because they worked in supportive and administrative roles rather than in the limelight, but who, in pursing work in male-dominated environments, paved the way for women to have leadership roles today. Her story gives us a richer sense of what women have done in behind-the-scenes roles and how that fits into the narratives of history’s “great men.”

Iphigene Ochs Sulzberger

Remembered best for her guidance to four publishers of the New York Times, Iphigene Ochs Sulzberger also helped strengthen the schools and parks of New York.

Death of Flora Lewis, “the world’s greatest correspondent”

June 2, 2002
“More and more people are coming to realize that they can choose their history. What a wonderful time to have been able to watch up close!”

Jill Abramson

As the first female executive editor of the New York Times from 2011–2014, Jill Abramson fought to change the newspaper’s culture, mentoring female reporters, choosing female bureau chiefs and focusing more attention on stories about race and gender issues.

Flora Lewis

Called “the world’s greatest correspondent” by New York Times editor A.M. Rosenthal, Flora Lewis covered the defining moments of the twentieth century and became a bureau chief for the Times.

Vivian Gornick

Vivian Gornick chronicled her own feminist awakening and that of the country through both her journalism for the Village Voice and her powerful memoirs.

Anzia Yezierska

Anzia Yezierska turned the frustrations and indignities she suffered in New York’s tenements into novels and short stories that depicted the lives of Jewish immigrants.

Miriam Cohen Glickman

One of the first white women to do field work for the civil rights movement in the South, Miriam Cohen Glickman was assumed to be black by the locals, who called her “bright,” a word for light-skinned African Americans.

Anne Roiphe

A prolific journalist, essayist and novelist, Anne Roiphe is known for tackling issues of feminism and Jewish identity in her writing.

New York Times reviews Nora Ephron’s last book

November 26, 2010

When Nora Ephron died, she would miss “taking a bath. Coming over the bridge to Manhattan. Pie.”

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "New York Times." (Viewed on April 25, 2015) <http://jwa.org/tags/new-york-times>.

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