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National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW)

Elissa Froman, 1983 - 2013

There are so many stories about Elissa Froman.

One of her closest friends, Emily Goodstein, tells of the time she and Froman were walking down a street in Washington, D.C., where they both lived. A homeless man who sat asking for change in front of a restaurant stopped them, addressing Elissa by name. He thanked her for making an appointment for him at a local healthcare clinic.

A favorite one that her mother, Gloria, relates: When Elissa was four years old, she asked, “Are we really alive, or is G-d dreaming us?”

Therese Loeb Schiff

Therese Loeb Schiff used her wealth to address a wide range of needs in the Jewish community, from organizing a literary series for the wealthy to stopping sex trafficking of young immigrant women.

Etta Lasker Rosensohn

Etta Lasker Rosensohn devoted herself to social work from an early age, culminating in her work for Hadassah as one of the founders of Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School in Jersusalem.

Sophia Moses Robison

Sociologist Sophia Moses Robison spent her career shattering stereotypes, from exposing the racial bias in labels of juvenile delinquency to debunking myths that immigrants were a drain on the economy.

Cecilia Razovsky

Cecilia Razovsky found countless ways to help Jewish refugees, from writing plays and pamphlets that changed public opinion to running numerous committees and organizations for immigrant aid.

Bertha Floersheim Rauh

A social reformer ahead of her time, Bertha Floersheim Rauh initiated dozens of vital services and completely overhauled Pittsburgh’s Department of Public Welfare.

Jennie Franklin Purvin

Of her many efforts to improve Chicago, the legacy that still stands as Jennie Franklin Purvin’s most visible accomplishment is the beachfronts on Lake Michigan for swimming and recreation.

Seraphine Eppstein Pisko

As executive secretary and vice president of the National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives in Denver, Seraphine Eppstein Pisko was one of the first women to lead a national Jewish institution.

Marion Simon Misch

Marion Simon Misch was doubly remarkable first as a Jewish community leader beginning in her teens and later as the first woman in New England to run a department store.

Alice Davis Menken

A descendent of prominent families whose American roots traced back before the Revolutionary War, Alice Davis Menken devoted her career to helping immigrant women and children get a fresh start.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW)." (Viewed on March 4, 2015) <http://jwa.org/tags/national-council-of-jewish-women-ncjw>.

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