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Memory

Tackling Text

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Text-heavy primary sources like newspaper articles, speeches, government documents and the like can be difficult for younger students or for indi

Working with Primary Sources

Learn more about identifying primary sources and explore tools, ideas, and tips for integrating them into education programs, classrooms, or communities.

The Loaded Tattoo

Today on Truth, Praise & Help, Renee Ghert-Zand expressed her displeasure at two Israeli men who decided to honor their Holocaust survivor matriarch with a tattoo of her Auschwitz number on their forearms. She, like many Jews, has trouble with tattoos and finds Holocaust remembrance tattoos particularly offensive.

AdDRESSING Women's Lives: Translating Interview into Art

The following is a piece by Ethan Grossman, a high school student at the Weber School in Atlanta. As part of a project called AdDRESSING Women's Lives, created by Barbara Rosenblit and Sheila Miller, Ethan interviewed Millie Rotter Kinbar and documented her oral history in a multi-media work of art, revealing her character and life experiences through the metaphor of a dress.

The Album as Archive, the Photograph as Story

On Sunday afternoon, twelve women sat around a table at the sunny education center of Mayyim Hayyim, in Newton, Mass. Each of us clutched -- gently, lovingly -- a few old photos, sepia-toned, worn at the edges. These photos held pieces of our history, and as many questions as answers.

AdDressing Women's Lives 2009

Last week, the students of the Weber School, a Jewish community high school in Atlanta, GA, participated in the exciting AdDRESSING Women's Lives project.  In 2002, two faculty members at the Weber School conceived of this interdisciplinary project for high school juniors and seniors studying the history of Jewish women in America.  Humanities and Bible teacher Barbara Rosenblit and conceptual artist Sheila Miller combined their interests and talents to create an innovative way for stud

The symbols we use to represent, and gender, Jewish women

Yesterday in Tablet magazine, Ruth Ellen Gruber* wrote about her trip to an old Jewish cemetery in Romania to look at the way images of shabbat candles are used on women's gravestones to convey meaning and memory. Gruber's project, (Candle)sticks on Stone, is time sensitive, as many of these gravestones are crumbling into obscurity, but, she writes, "those that remain comprise wonderful examples of vivid local stone-carving that fuse local folk art and Jewish iconography." Gruber is interested in presenting these carvings as works of art, but she does acknowledge the depth and complexity these carvings carry concerning the intersection of symbolism, Jewish tradition, and gender roles.

20 Questions to Ask the Important Women in Your Life

Create your family history with your mother, your grandmother, and your aunts (bring your tape recorder or video camera!)

How-To: In Our Own Voices

In Our Own Voices is a how-to guide for conducting life history interviews with American Jewish women. Designed for use by individuals, as well as community groups, the guide invites readers to become "makers of history" by using oral history to capture and preserve the stories of their mothers and grandmothers, teachers and colleagues, community members and friends.

Basic preservation tips for family papers and personal archives

Remember the day you became a Bat Mitzvah? The day you graduated from high school? Did you save your exams from college? Did you ever keep a diary? Write letters home from camp?

Pages

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Memory." (Viewed on October 20, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/memory>.

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