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Letter Writing

Immigrant Mary Antin packs the house at the Waldorf Astoria.

December 8, 1912

Mary Antin writes, “I was born, I have lived, and I have been made over. Is it not time to write my life’s story?”

Grace Seixas Nathan

Grace Seixas was born in Stratford, Connecticut, on November 11, 1752, into a family that loved both America and Jewishness and encouraged learning for all of its members. She began writing poetry as a young woman and continued this pursuit until her death, although none of her work was published during her lifetime.

Yiddish: Women's Participation in Eastern European Yiddish Press (1862-1903)

The Yiddish press was welcomed by Jewish women, as it allowed them to move from the domestic into the public sphere and to have an impact upon the latter. Immediately upon the press’s appearance, women submitted correspondence and translations of foreign literary works.

Havvah Shapiro

Over her lifetime, Havvah Shapiro composed some fifty pieces of literary criticism, fiction, or journalism appearing in over half a dozen Hebrew periodicals, as well as a collection of short sketches and a scholarly monograph. Of the nineteenth-century women writers of Hebrew in the Diaspora, Shapiro is the most prolific.

Nelly Leonie Sachs

In 1966, Nelly Sachs was recognized as the only German-speaking woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, an honor she shared with the Galician-born Israeli novelist Shmuel Yosef Agnon (1888–1970).

Rothschild Women

Strangely enough, the Rothschild women enjoyed greater ease than their menfolk. All but a few enjoyed the position they were assigned and obviously took great pride in a Jewish family’s rise to fame and fortune.

Maskilot, Nineteenth Century

In referring to Jewish women proponents of the Haskalah (Enlightenment) who wished to take part in the cultural and social revolution that the Haskalah movement preached, the Hebrew term maskilot refers not only to their ideology but also to their language: these were women who wrote in Hebrew.

Lucie Domeier

As a young woman Lucie Domeier (born Esther Gad) probably led a traditional Jewish life. Born in Breslau circa 1767, she married a merchant, Bernard, and bore two children—a son, Jonas, in c. 1791, and a daughter, Jeanette, in 1795. However, we soon find signs of her in the world of educated women, writers and philosophers.

275 Years of Anxiety about Assimilation

Never in my relatively short life do I remember a time where there wasn't a sense of urgency, even panic, in the American Jewish community around intermarriage and Jewish continuity. 

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Letter Writing." (Viewed on September 22, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/letter-writing>.

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