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Language

The Culture of Chill: A Dialogue

This piece was originally posted on the Ma’yan blog.

A few weeks ago, Natalie Bergner and I (John Foley), both in our final weeks as summer interns at Ma’yan, were having a casual conversation about the implications of the word "chill." That discussion evolved into a larger one about politics, sexism and the dynamics of feminism in youth culture. What follows is a conversation in which we examine "chill culture.” While it was difficult to come to a consensus on the word and its implications, we hope that our dialogue will spark others to come to their own conclusions about how the word is and should be used. 

Remembering Netiva Ben-Yehuda

Many years ago I was sitting in a kibbutz dining hall in the north of Israel. One of the older members, a woman, was reminiscing about the equality of the sexes that supposedly existed when the kibbutz was founded.

תרומה –תצוה (Exodus 25- 30:10) T'rumah and T'tzaveh-- And you shall be a blessing....

February is Jewish Disability Awareness month. Awareness itself is an interesting term to wrap your mind around, it makes me ask: how are we building “awareness” and about what specifically? Are we being ‘aware’ just by engaging in conversations about disabilities? How do we talk about disability, in what context, and what actions are we taking in our society to help those who may have different physical or mental challenges.

National Humanities Medal awarded to Ruth Wisse

November 15, 2007

Pioneering Yiddish scholar Ruth Wisse was awarded the prestigious National Humanities Medal.

A vagina by any other name…

Over lunch today, our conversation turned to an article a couple of us had recently read in Tablet about Yiddish words for vagina. (Yes, this is fairly typical lunchtime conversation at the Jewish Women's Archive.) None of us had really thought much about this topic before, but we were all quite intrigued. Why yes, it IS strange, we agreed with the author, Elissa Strauss, that Yiddish slang for penis has been assimilated into general English usage, while Yiddish slang for vagina is virtually unknown.

Helen Tanzer

Contributing to the dissemination of classical and archaeological works, Tanzer well fulfilled the rigorous requirements of scholar and teacher.

Elise Richter

One of the first women to earn a doctorate from the University of Vienna, Elise Richter was the only woman to hold an academic appointment at an Austrian university before World War I. As an instructor and later an associate professor of Romance languages at her alma mater until 1938, she made important scholarly contributions to the field of historical and comparative linguistics.

Dorothee Metlitzki

Dorothee Metlitzki, a philologist and medievalist, was born to factory owner Israel Metlitzki, a Russian Jew, and Rosa Malbin, a German Jew, on July 27, 1914, in Koningsberg, then in Germany, and spent her youth in various places in Eastern Europe.

Deborah Marcus Melamed

Deborah Marcus Melamed wished that Jewish ceremonies, customs, and symbols would enthrall the hearts of women. She believed that Jewish women could mold Jewish practices and invest them with meaning, and that in doing so they would contribute to the preservation of Judaism.

Lonka Korzybrodska

Lonka Korzybrodska was born in the town of Pruszków, near Warsaw. The influence which her father Avraham, a teacher, exerted on the young people of the town is evidenced by the fact that most of his students joined pioneer youth movements.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Language." (Viewed on November 28, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/language>.

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