You are here

Share Share Share Share Share Share Share

Housing

Overturn the World

On July 2, 1965 the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) began its work for women's equality, enforcing Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which among other things prohibited employment discrimination within labor unions. This week, we take a glimpse even farther back, to the turn of the century, to the roots of women organizing for fair prices.

Labor History Landmark: No. 11 The Lower East Side Tenement Museum

The Top 11 Labor History Landmarks in New York City is a blog series on Jewesses with Attitude created in honor of Women's History Month and the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Waist Factory fire. Learn more about the series here, or check out JWA's online walking tour.

Labor History Landmark: No. 2 Tenements on 6th or 7th Streets

The Top 11 Labor History Landmarks in New York City is a blog series on Jewesses with Attitude created in honor of Women's History Month and the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Waist Factory fire. Learn more about the series here, or check out JWA's online walking tour.

10 Things You Should Know About Pauline Newman

Born in Kovno, Lithuania, in 1890, Pauline Newman was barred from the local public school because she was Jewish. As a girl, her opportunities for a Jewish education were limited. Her father tutored well-to-do boys in Talmud; he eventually allowed her to attend Sunday classes, where she learned to read and write both Yiddish and Hebrew. The obstacles she faced in getting an education motivated her to fight for gender equality later in her life.

Clara Fox, 1917 - 2007

Clara Fox, a social visionary and a consummate professional, died on November 9, 2007, at the age of 90. She began her career as a director of programs for young people with mental illnesses. She then went on to become an expert in early childhood programs and was asked by the Lindsay Administration to organize the first Head Start Program for New York City. Her work in early childhood education led to an awareness of the housing problems that were prevalent in New York.

Suburbanization in the United States

Few Jews participated in the first wave of suburbanization during the final decades of the nineteenth century. Today, suburbs are the popular residential choice of most Americans. Despite their increasing diversity, they still lack the population density, poverty, and public culture of urban centers.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Housing." (Viewed on July 28, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/housing>.

Donate

Help us elevate the voices of Jewish women.

donate now

Sign Up for JWA eNews

 

Discover Education Programs

Join our growing community of educators.

view programs