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Hadassah

Margaret Fleet, 1919 - 2013

When Margaret Fishler Fleet graduated from St. Joseph’s Academy of Music in Fernandina Beach, FL many years ago, her beloved piano teacher, Sister Nola, gave Margaret the nun’s only worldly possession, a lace handkerchief as a present. So profound was Margaret’s love of music that she made sure each of her four daughters and her granddaughters carried the handkerchief during their own weddings. A week before she died, she mustered the energy to perform a final piano recital for her family.

Fannie Eller Lorber

When her community became a mecca for adults suffering from tuberculosis, Fannie Eller Lorber created a Jewish children’s home for those who had no one else to care for them.

Charlotte Lipsky

Charlotte Schacht Lipsky found an unusual balance between activism and pragmatism: on the one hand, a follower of the revolutionary Emma Goldman, on the other, the owner of a successful interior decorating business.

Elma Ehrlich Levinger

Elma Ehrlich Levinger helped strengthen the Jewish community through her leadership of Jewish women’s organizations, but her books for children and adults may have had an even greater impact on American Jews.

Bertha Szold Levin

Bertha Szold Levin, the youngest sister of Henrietta Szold, served for sixteen years as the first woman member of the Baltimore City School Board and pushed for the inclusion of working women in Hadassah.

Lotta Levensohn

Lotta Levensohn helped found Hadassah and later played a pivotal role in the organization’s history as an independent organization for Zionist women.

Sara Lee

As director of the Rhea Hirsch School of Education at Hebrew Union College, Sara Lee helped transformed day schools, Hebrew schools and other Jewish institutions.

Miriam Belsky Solotaroff

Miriam Belsky Solotaroff made headlines in 1937 when she “rocked the school board” of New York for insisting on maternity leave to care for an adopted baby, a privilege only granted to biological mothers at the time.

Sarah Kussy

With seemingly limitless energy, Sarah Kussy helped found and lead a variety of major Jewish organizations like Hadassah, the United Synagogue’s Women’s League, and Young Judea.

Anna Moscowitz Kross

Anna Moscowitz Kross helped reform the New York prison system by curbing abuses and offering felons chances to train in new skills.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Hadassah." (Viewed on December 28, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/hadassah>.

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