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The Feminine Mystique

Betty Friedan

For her acclaimed book, The Feminine Mystique, and her presidency of the National Organization for Women, Betty Friedan is hailed as the mother of second wave feminism.

Planting the seed: Memories of "The Feminine Mystique"

There’s a lot of buzz these days about Stephanie Coontz’s new book A Strong Stirring, an assessment of Betty Friedans’s 1963 manifesto The Feminine Mystique. It’s stirring up some personal memories of my own.

Betty Friedan, 1921 - 2006

The news of Betty Friedan’s death made me feel that I had a lost an old and dear friend—and for many women everywhere, so we had. If there was any one woman who could be called the mother of feminism, it was Betty Friedan. Though “second-wave” feminism was a collective endeavor that had many founders, Friedan was the spark plug whose furious indictment of “the problem that had no name”—the false consciousness of “happy housewifery”—set off a revolution more potent than many of the other social and cultural upheavals of the 1960s.

Meetings held to plan National Organization for Women

June 30, 1966

The foundation for the National Organization for Women was laid at a meeting in Betty Friedan's hotel room in Washington, DC.

Publication of "The Feminine Mystique" by Betty Friedan

February 17, 1963

Publication of "The Feminine Mystique" by Betty Friedan; the book is credited with sparking the modern feminist movement.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "The Feminine Mystique." (Viewed on October 31, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/feminine-mystique>.

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