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Columbia University

Kathryn Wasserman Davis, 1907 - 2013

Having skied into her 80s, played tennis into her 90s, and kayaked, swum, painted, traveled and taken on all comers at croquet until this year, Kathryn Wasserman Davis remained a wonder and inspiration to those around her. Recently asked by one of her great-grandchildren to name her favorite day, she instantly replied, “Tomorrow.”

Paula Hyman, 1946 - 2011

 Despite talking on occasion about death, and Paula telling me that rarely did a day go by that she did not think about her own mortality, like most people I preferred to imagine that we all would live forever, or at least long enough.

Paula crammed so much life and accomplishments into her 65 years. She tasted many pleasures, including some—like grandchildren—she had not assumed that she would experience.

Ellen Moers

While early critics attacked Ellen Moers’s 1976 book Literary Women for its exclusive focus on women writers, her analysis of Mary Shelley and other women writers reshaped our understanding of their work.

Linda Rosenberg Miller

Unsatisfied with the traditional pursuits of married women of her day, Linda Rosenberg Miller devoted herself to Jewish studies and collecting art and archeological treasures.

Gertrude Geraldine Michelson

Gertrude Geraldine “G.G.” Michelson’s trailblazing corporate career included a number of important firsts, from the first female member of the New York State Financial Control Board to the first female chair of the board of trustees of an Ivy League school.

Eve Merriam

Eve Merriam mingled poetry for children with devastating social criticism for adults, like her Inner City Mother Goose, which became one of the most banned books of all time.

Irma May

During the economic devastation of the 1920s, Irma May reported on anti–Semitism throughout Eastern Europe and raised massive funds to help Jews overseas.

Esther Lowenthal

Esther Lowenthal’s long career teaching economics at Smith explored subjects from government spending and taxation to the theories of socialist economists.

Lillian R. Lieber

Frustrated with the way math is taught in schools, Lillian R. Lieber created unconventional, popular books to excite young readers and incite their curiosity.

Margaret Seligman Lewisohn

Margaret Seligman Lewisohn not only gave generously to education causes, as the head of the Public Education Association she helped make the community as passionate about education as she was.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Columbia University." (Viewed on December 18, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/columbia-university>.

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