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Columbia University

Kathryn Wasserman Davis, 1907 - 2013

Having skied into her 80s, played tennis into her 90s, and kayaked, swum, painted, traveled and taken on all comers at croquet until this year, Kathryn Wasserman Davis remained a wonder and inspiration to those around her. Recently asked by one of her great-grandchildren to name her favorite day, she instantly replied, “Tomorrow.”

Paula Hyman, 1946 - 2011

 Despite talking on occasion about death, and Paula telling me that rarely did a day go by that she did not think about her own mortality, like most people I preferred to imagine that we all would live forever, or at least long enough.

Paula crammed so much life and accomplishments into her 65 years. She tasted many pleasures, including some—like grandchildren—she had not assumed that she would experience.

Frances Horwich

Frances Horwich was loved by parents and children alike for her educational television show, Ding Dong School.

Clarisse Doris Hellman

C. Doris Hellman’s study of Johannes Kepler and other Renaissance scientists made her one of the first professional historians of science in the US.

Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun lived two rich and full lives, one as an esteemed scholar of modern British literature, the other as the popular mystery writer Amanda Cross.

Amelia Greenwald

Amelia Greenwald focused her career in public health nursing on training other nurses and creating infrastructure in war-ravaged Europe.

Emma Leon Gottheil

As a translator, Emma Leon Gottheil helped spread the ideals of Zionism across America, but as founder of the Women’s League for Palestine, she helped turn those ideals into practical reality.

Rose Goldstein

Rose Goldstein worked to support women’s greater involvement in Jewish ritual life through her education work with United Synagogue and her essential guide to Jewish prayer, A Time to Pray: A Personal Approach to the Jewish Prayer Book.

Rebecca Fischel Goldstein

Both as a rabbi’s wife and as a leader in her own right, Rebecca Fischel Goldstein strove to make women a significant force in Orthodox Judaism.

Pauline Goldmark

Pauline Goldmark’s talents as a researcher made her indispensable to labor rights initiatives, from investigating the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire to helping lead Columbia University’s School of Social Work.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Columbia University." (Viewed on September 17, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/columbia-university>.

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