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Children's Literature

Sandy Sasso

Sandy Eisenberg Sasso was the first woman rabbi ordained by the Reconstructionist movement, which was one of many firsts in her career.

Lucille Corcos

Lucille Corcos was celebrated as one of the foremost “modern primitivist” painters in America, creating scenes where the outside walls of buildings fell away to reveal the lives of those within.

Molly Cone

Molly Lamken Cone produced more than forty children’s books in her career, ranging from young adult novels to introductions to Judaism for younger readers.

Barbara Cohen

In children’s books like Molly’s Pilgrim, Barbara Cohen confronted taboo subjects of assimilation, racism, and cancer with both sensitivity and remarkable honesty.

Madeline Brandeis

In her novels and movies, Madeline Brandeis offered children windows into a multitude of other cultures.

Sue Alexander

Sue Alexander wove her life into the children’s books she wrote and helped create a support network for other creators as a founding board member of the international Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

Dina Abramowicz

After surviving the Holocaust, Dina Abramowicz reconstituted her rich cultural heritage as the formidable head librarian of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

Muriel Rukeyser

Muriel Rukeyer’s poetry reflected her passionate activism and her belief in confronting the truth of her lived experience.

Judy Blume

Judy Blume’s books, known for their humor and their honest portrayal of the pains of adolescence, have shaped generations of young girls.

Freedom Stories

The first books I ever fell in love with were the American Girl books. The American Girl Company as a whole was a big part of my childhood, and its influence is still with me today: if it weren’t for it and Billy Joel’s “We Didn’t Start The Fire,” I don’t know if I would have passed US History last year. Educational value aside, the books have held up as fantastic examples of children’s literature, with their beautiful illustrations, interesting historical notes in the margins, diverse characters (including their cast of thirteen young female protagonists), and, most importantly to me, simple but solid stories.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Children's Literature." (Viewed on July 23, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/childrens-literature>.

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