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Chemistry

Nina Fefferman

Evolutionary biologist and epidemiologist Nina Fefferman uses mathematical models to chart how individual choices ripple outward to affect whole groups, helping create strategies to save populations from endangered tortoises to human communities stricken by disease.

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman

Joyce Jacobson Kaufman’s groundbreaking work in chemistry and physics led to major advancements for the designs of compounds ranging from pharmacological drugs to rocket fuel.

Irene Caroline Diner Koenigsberger

Irene Caroline Diner Koenigsberger discovered the molecular structure of rubber but refused to patent her work, making her discovery available to all.

Mildred Cohn

Biochemist Mildred Cohn used new technology to measure organic reactions in living cells.

May Brodbeck

May Brodbeck’s career in the sciences ran the gamut from teaching high school chemistry to exploring fundamental philosophical questions about the nature of human consciousness.

Elsa Neumann

Elsa Neumann earned a doctorate in physics from the University of Berlin in 1899, nine years before women were officially allowed to study there, becoming the university’s first woman graduate.

Gerty Theresa Cori

Gerty Cori’s work on carbohydrate metabolism, which changed our understanding of diabetes and other diseases, earned her the Nobel Prize for Medicine, making her the first American woman and third woman ever given the honor.

Gertrude Elion inducted into the Jewish-American Hall of Fame

JWA Woman of Valor Gertrude Elion has been chosen as the 2011 honoree to be inducted into the Jewish-American Hall of Fame. Dr. Gertrude Elion joins nine women previously inducted into the Jewish-American Hall of Fame: Henrietta Szold (1976), Golda Meir (1978), Rebecca Gratz (1981), Emma Lazarus (1983), Ernestine Rose (1984), Barbra Streisand (1997), Ida Straus (1998), Bess Myerson (2001), and Lillian Wald (2007). Biographies of all the honorees can be found here.

Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, 1921 - 2011

A Jewish woman whose father-in-law is a rabbi, who keeps a kosher home, who invites her lab assistants to Passover seders, and worries about them catching colds is not the typical image of a Nobel Prize winner. But it is the image of Rosalyn Yalow, the first woman born and educated in the United States to win a Nobel Prize in a scientific field.

Mildred Cohn, 1913 - 2009

Mildred Cohn's scientific career could perhaps be described as a series of silver linings. She displayed a tremendous intellectual talent in her early years—having completed her undergraduate degree in chemistry at Hunter College (then a women's school) before the age of 18, designing a model of a combustion engine by 21, and obtaining a PhD under legendary chemist and Nobel laureate Harold Urey by 24—that today would make her the pick of the scientific litter.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Chemistry." (Viewed on December 21, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/chemistry>.

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