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Brandeis University

Adele Rosenwald Levy

Philanthropist Adele Rosenwald Levy demonstrated her leadership skills and her passion for the Jewish community when she helped inspire American Jews to donate even more to aid Holocaust survivors than they had given to support the war effort.

Florence Heller

An important benefactress of Brandeis University, Florence Grunsfeld Heller made her mark as one of the first women to run a general Jewish organization, the Jewish Welfare Board.

Barbara Jacobs Haber

Barbara Jacobs Haber focused her civil rights activism on sit-ins and desegregating restaurants and bars.

Miriam Cohen Glickman

One of the first white women to do field work for the civil rights movement in the South, Miriam Cohen Glickman was assumed to be black by the locals, who called her “bright,” a word for light-skinned African Americans.

Adrienne Cecile Rich

Adrienne Cecile Rich used her poetry as a means to reclaim the voices of the silenced, drawing from her own experience as a woman and lesbian.

Anne Lapidus Lerner

Both through her scholarship and through her service as the first woman vice chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, Anne Lapidus Lerner helped make women’s studies an important sub-discipline of Jewish studies.

Joyce Antler

Using both field research and her own experiences posing as a pregnant woman, Joyce Antler not only helped repeal New York’s laws against abortion, but ensured that women had real access to medical services after the law was repealed.

Birth of Florence Melton, Innovator in Jewish Education

November 6, 1911

Florence Melton wanted others to "spend some, save some, and share some."

Teaching Sex Ed to Young Modern Orthodox Women

In the years I attended Modern Orthodox day schools, I received close to zero sex education. Aside from one class period in the sixth grade dedicated to menstruation and a week during my senior year devoted to learning the laws of Neidah (Jewish ritual purity laws relating to menstruation), I remained in the dark about reproduction and sexual health, as well as about how they related to my identity as a young Jewish woman.

How I Accidentally Became A Jewish Historian

Like many recent college graduates, I began my job hunt by asking myself some difficult questions “What do I want to do? Who do I want to be?

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Brandeis University." (Viewed on November 28, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/brandeis-university>.

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