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Ballet

Tatjana Barbakoff

The daughter of a Chinese mother and a Russian Jewish father, Tatjana Barbakoff used her mixed heritage as inspiration for stunning and innovative dance performances.

Mia Arbatova

Told first by her parents that dancing was immodest and then by Israeli settlers that dancing was bourgeois, Mia Arbatova defied her critics and became a pioneer of ballet in Israel.

Death of Susan Braun, dance archivist

October 3, 1995
Artist Susan Braun made an about-face in her career in the art world and began to fill the need of documenting dance on film.

Allegra Kent

Ballerina Allegra Kent danced almost all the principal roles choreographed by George Balanchine in her remarkable career, which lasted far beyond when most dancers retired from the stage.

Katya Delakova

Katya Delakova was a pioneer of Jewish dance, blending folk traditions, Hasidic worship, modern dance, and improvisation.

Melissa Hayden

Melissa Hayden showed unparalleled versatility and range in her ballet dancing, prompting choreographers to create roles specifically for her during a career that spanned decades at the top of her profession.

Goldie Hawn

As an actress, Goldie Hawn became known for playing dumb blondes, but behind the camera, she was determined to fulfill her vision as an executive producer and director.

Selma Jeanne Cohen

Selma Jeanne Cohen transformed the field of dance by giving critics and historians the language to discuss the nuances of performance and choreography.

Shirley Silver Selis

Known as “Fuzzy” to her friends and family, Shirley Selis was born in 1917 in Baltimore and developed a lifelong passion for dance in childhood.

The Indomitable Jewish Ballerina Who Inspired a Timeless Love Song

In 1944, at the height of the worst carnage the world has known, a mother in Budapest, Hungary, put her only son, then seven years old, out on the street with a pillow, a last morsel of bread, and the boy’s baptismal certificate. The mother was Jewish, the son Catholic.

Fifty years later the son, Cesare Frustaci—by that time an American citizen with a family of his own—contributed a video-taped oral history to Yale University and then sent the tape to author Germaine Shames. It told the story of his mother, ballerina Margit Wolf, who was banished from the stage by Mussolini only to inspire a timeless love song and then fade from history without a trace.

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How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Ballet." (Viewed on July 31, 2015) <http://jwa.org/tags/ballet>.

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