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Adolescence

Judy Blume

Judy Blume’s books, known for their humor and their honest portrayal of the pains of adolescence, have shaped generations of young girls.

Backing up birth control, and each other

In an ironic, but perhaps unplanned turn of events, this year's Back Up Your Birth Control Day of Action comes the day after the premiere of season 4 of 16 and Pregnant. (And if you think I haven't been waiting for this television event since the end of last season...you would be wrong.)

Interfaith leaders rally to raise awareness of homelessness among LGBTQ youth

When I moved to New York City, I was told that there are a set of rules one should follow in order to ride the subway safely.

My super-uncool, roller-skating bat mitzvah

I remember the crackling sound of late nineties alt-rock and the stench of roller-rink pizza like it was just yesterday.

My journey to love my legs and understand the Feminist movement

“How could you?!” Esther screamed.
“What? What are you talking about?” I asked.

Bat Mitzvah: A Balancing Act

A few months back, I dragged my 12-year-old, Harry-Potter-enthusiast sister to go with me to see the new Disney princess movie Tangled (which retells the Rapunzel story). In one part of the film, Rapunzel has just escaped from the tower against her mother's wishes and is encountering the World, and her independence, for the first time. (Watch the clip here.) While her companion patiently waits for her to come to terms with her new-found freedom, Rapunzel goes from one extreme to the other, from excitement to shame and worry.

Summer Camping in the United States

Summer camping became an American institution in the aftermath of World War I, evolving within a society that was concerned with children and wished to raise the next generation as "able bodied" and "morally upright" American citizens.

Gisela Peiper Konopka

Gisela Konopka’s outstanding career in youth and adolescent services, social work, education and history is reflected in her litany: “All my life I have been fighting for justice, and for respect for all people. I abhor any arrogance related to race, religion, nationality, appearance, sex, age, intelligence, profession, money. That arrogance is wrong. What is important is what a person is, and does, for the community.”

Clarice Baright

Known to her contemporaries as the “Lady Angel of the Tenement District,” Clarice Baright was a social worker and a trailblazing attorney who combined these skills as an advocate for the rights of New York City’s children and its poor. In a career spanning the first half of the twentieth century, Baright fought for reforms in the style and spirit of the Progressive Era, while earning the distinctions of serving as the second female magistrate in New York City history and of being among the first few women admitted to the American Bar Association.

How to cite this page

Jewish Women's Archive. "Adolescence." (Viewed on September 22, 2014) <http://jwa.org/tags/adolescence>.

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